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This resource outlines the generally accepted structure for introductions, body paragraphs, and conclusions in an academic argument paper. Keep in mind that this resource contains guidelines and not strict rules about organization. Your structure needs to be flexible enough to meet the requirements of your purpose and audience.

Conclusions wrap up what you have been discussing in your paper. After moving from general to specific information in the introduction and body paragraphs, your conclusion should begin pulling back into more general information that restates the main points of your argument. Conclusions may also call for action or overview future possible research. The following outline may help you conclude your paper:

In a general way,

  • Restate your topic and why it is important,
  • Restate your thesis/claim,
  • Address opposing viewpoints and explain why readers should align with your position,
  • Call for action or overview future research possibilities.

Remember that once you accomplish these tasks, unless otherwise directed by your instructor, you are finished. Done. Complete. Don't try to bring in new points or end with a whiz bang(!) conclusion or try to solve world hunger in the final sentence of your conclusion. Simplicity is best for a clear, convincing message.

The preacher's maxim is one of the most effective formulas to follow for argument papers:

Tell what you're going to tell them (introduction).

Tell them (body).

Tell them what you told them (conclusion).

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How to Write a Clear and Strong Conclusion for Argumentative Essay

Stefani H.

Table of contents

So, you've made it to the end of your argumentative essay. After pouring your efforts into researching and crafting compelling arguments in your introductory and body paragraphs, you're now left wondering, "What on earth do I write in the conclusion paragraph?"

Sound familiar? Well, you're not alone.

Writing conclusion paragraphs often feels like a daunting task. You might find yourself thinking, "What can I say that hasn’t already been said?" However, don't let this uncertainty trick you into undermining the value of a well-written conclusion.

Writing conclusions shouldn't be taken lightly. In fact, the conclusion paragraph is the finishing touch that packages your essay neatly, communicating to the reader that you have provided the closure your argument deserves.

Think about it: you wouldn't gift someone a present without wrapping it, right? Similarly, no matter how strong the arguments you've raised in your essay are, without a solid conclusion, your essay may seem incomplete or lackluster.

In this guide, we'll explore how to write a strong conclusion paragraph in an argumentative essay, ensuring your essay is wrapped up just as beautifully as it was crafted.

The Purpose of a Conclusion Paragraph in an Argumentative Essay

A conclusion paragraph is like the final bow in a performance—it's your last opportunity to impress the audience and leave a lasting impression. In an argumentative essay, this "final bow" serves a few critical roles.

Firstly , the conclusion reaffirms your thesis statement. It brings the reader back to your main argument and reminds them of the stance you've taken. It's not about introducing new ideas, but rather solidifying the ones you've already presented.

Secondly , it's a summary of your main points or arguments. It offers the reader a concise overview of the ground you've covered, tying together all the threads of your argument into a cohesive narrative.

Lastly , it presents a final statement—an impactful sentence or two that leaves the reader with something to ponder. This could be a thought-provoking question, a call to action, or a prediction about the future. It serves to cement your argument in the reader's mind and ensure your essay is memorable.

Now that we've established the critical roles of a conclusion, let's take a closer look at the structure of an argumentative essay, and specifically, how to build a strong conclusion paragraph.

Components of a Strong Conclusion Paragraph

A powerful conclusion to an argumentative essay contains several key elements. Let's break them down:

Restating the Thesis Statement : start by revisiting your thesis statement. This doesn't mean copying it word for word from your introduction, but rather, paraphrasing it in a new light. Given the evidence and arguments you've presented, this reaffirms your position and reminds your reader of the claim you've defended.

Summarizing Main Points/Arguments : next, offer a brief recap of the main points or arguments you've made in the body of your essay. This should be succinct and help tie everything together. Remember, it's a summary—avoid going into too much detail or bringing up any new information.

Presenting the Final Statement : the final statement is your last chance to leave a lasting impression or provoke thought in your reader. This could be a call to action, a quotation, or a forward-looking statement about the implications of your argument. Make sure it reinforces your thesis and wraps up your essay well.

Discussing Broader Implications or Significance : lastly, if appropriate, discuss the broader implications of your topic. How does your argument fit into the larger context? What impact might it have on the future? This helps your reader understand the relevance and potential influence of your argument.

Now that we understand the components let's move on to how to put them together to form an effective conclusion paragraph.

KEY POINTS : " In writing your conclusion, remember to restate your thesis in a fresh and interesting way. Then, summarize your main arguments concisely, ensuring they tie back to your thesis. Consider discussing broader implications or impact of your argument if relevant, to give your conclusion a strong finish. "

Writing a Strong Conclusion: Step-by-Step Approach

Crafting a strong conclusion isn't rocket science, but it does require some thoughtful effort. Follow this step-by-step approach to ensure your conclusion effectively wraps up your argument.

Step 1: Begin by Transitioning Smoothly

First and foremost, don’t abruptly jump into your conclusion. Use transitional phrases such as "in conclusion," "to sum up," or "finally" to signal to the reader that you are wrapping up your argument.

Step 2: Restate Your Thesis

Revisit your thesis statement in the light of the arguments you've made. Remember to paraphrase it—simply copy-pasting the statement won't do. Make it clear that the evidence and points you've presented support your thesis statement .

Step 3: Summarize Your Main Arguments

Next, briefly summarize the main points or arguments you've made in your essay. This is your opportunity to reinforce these points and remind the reader of their importance. Be succinct and avoid introducing any new information.

Step 4: Make Your Final Statement

Your final statement should leave a lasting impression. This could be a provocative question, a prediction, or a call to action—something that will resonate with your reader and encourage further thought or action.

Step 5: Discuss Broader Implications

If it fits your topic, consider discussing the broader implications or significance of your argument. This helps connect your argument to a larger context and can show your reader why your topic matters.

Step 6: Review and Polish

Finally, review your conclusion. Does it flow well? Does it provide a compelling and concise wrap-up of your argument? Make sure to polish your language and check for any errors.

Remember, the conclusion is your last opportunity to leave a lasting impression on your reader, so make it count. If you'd like to see how these steps look in practice, stay tuned for our examples of well-written conclusion paragraphs coming up next.

Examples of Well-Written Conclusion Paragraphs

There's nothing like good examples to illustrate a point. Here are a few well-written conclusion paragraphs from argumentative essays to help you better understand the process we just outlined.

Example 1 : Let's say our thesis statement was, "Despite some drawbacks, the benefits of online learning—such as flexibility and accessibility—make it a viable alternative to traditional education."

Conclusion paragraph : "In conclusion, the rise of online learning is not without its challenges. Technical glitches, lack of interpersonal communication, and the requirement for self-motivation can make it seem less appealing to some. However, when we consider the unmatched flexibility and accessibility it offers to learners worldwide, it's clear that online education is a powerful tool in our educational arsenal. It may not replace traditional education entirely, but it undoubtedly provides a viable alternative for many. As technology continues to advance, we can only anticipate the further enhancement of online learning experiences."

Example 2 : Suppose our thesis statement was, "Even though it is a source of renewable energy, the environmental and social costs of large-scale hydroelectric dams often outweigh their benefits."

Conclusion paragraph : "To sum up, while large-scale hydroelectric dams have long been hailed for their ability to generate renewable energy, we must also consider the significant environmental and social costs associated with them. The destruction of habitats, displacement of local communities, and the risk of catastrophic failure present serious challenges to their continued development. Though the quest for sustainable energy solutions is more critical than ever, it is essential that we weigh these concerns carefully and explore more environmentally and socially responsible alternatives."

These examples should give you a clear picture of how a well-crafted conclusion ties an argumentative essay together. Up next, we'll discuss some common pitfalls to avoid when writing your conclusion.

Common Pitfalls to Avoid When Writing Your Conclusion

As important as it is to know what to include in your conclusion, it's equally crucial to understand what to avoid. Below are some common pitfalls that can weaken your conclusion:

Introducing New Information : your conclusion is not the place to introduce new arguments or information. It should synthesize what you've already discussed, not open up new lines of debate.

Simply Restating the Introduction : while your conclusion should revisit your thesis statement and main points, avoid merely restating your introduction. Your conclusion should add value by providing a fresh perspective or highlighting the implications of your argument.

Making Unsupported Claims : your conclusion should be based on the evidence and arguments you've presented in your essay. Avoid making sweeping claims or statements that aren't backed by your essay's content.

Being Vague or Unclear : your conclusion should be clear and concise. Avoid using vague language or unclear statements that could confuse your reader.

Neglecting the Broader Significance : if it's relevant to your topic, your conclusion is an excellent place to discuss the broader significance or implications of your argument. Avoid missing this opportunity to show your reader why your argument matters.

By being aware of these common pitfalls, you can ensure your conclusion is strong, compelling, and effective. Now, you should be well-equipped to write a strong conclusion for your argumentative essay. But remember, practice makes perfect!

Final Thoughts

Writing a strong conclusion for your argumentative essay is crucial. It provides closure and drives home the main points of your argument one last time. Remember, your conclusion is your last chance to persuade your reader and leave a lasting impression.

Restate your thesis, summarize your main points, make a memorable final statement, and, if applicable, discuss the broader implications of your argument. Avoid common pitfalls like introducing new information or merely restating your introduction.

Take the time to practice this skill and consider utilizing the resources provided above for further learning and improvement. With persistence and patience, you will master the art of writing compelling conclusions.

However, if you find yourself struggling, remember that help is just a click away. At our argumentative essay writing service for students , we have a team of skilled writers who can deliver top-notch custom essays tailored to your specific needs. We're here to help you succeed.

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How to Write a Conclusion for an Argumentative Essay

How to Write a Conclusion for an Argumentative Essay

3-minute read

  • 27th October 2023

You’ve spent hours researching and writing a compelling argumentative essay – now it’s finally time to write the conclusion. The conclusion may be the most significant part of your essay because it’s your final opportunity to make a lasting impression on your reader. Intimidated? Don’t be! In this post, we’ll show you how to write a strong conclusion for an argumentative essay.

Restate the Thesis and Summarize the Key Points

Begin by reiterating your thesis statement to emphasize your main point. However, to avoid sounding repetitive, it’s best to paraphrase the thesis and not use the exact wording from the introductory paragraph. You can also briefly recap the key points you’ve made throughout your essay. You don’t need to dive into too much detail here; the conclusion should be a concise reminder of your most critical arguments and avoid unnecessary repetition or commentary. Keep in mind that the conclusion is not the place to provide information or arguments you haven’t included in the body of your essay.

Emphasize the Significance of Your Arguments

The conclusion of your essay is a good place to highlight the importance of your argument and the implications of your findings. Briefly explain why your essay topic is significant and how your perspective relates to the wider context. For example, if you’re writing on the rising cost of medicine, you can discuss how this topic relates to the broader fields of health care and pharmaceutical sales.

Briefly Address Counterarguments

If you’ve discussed counterarguments in your essay, briefly acknowledge them in the conclusion. You can simply mention that although there are opposing views, you’ve supported your argument with the evidence presented in your essay.

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Maintain a Consistent Tone

Keep the tone of your conclusion consistent with the rest of the essay. For example, if your essay has been primarily formal and academic, maintain that tone in the conclusion (e.g., avoid closing with an informal anecdote or a witty observation).

End With a Thought-Provoking Statement

End your conclusion with a thought-provoking statement or call to action . This could involve a recommendation or prediction, or you could pinpoint areas for further research or action related to the topic. For example, if your topic is the impact of technology on education, you could end your essay by recommending further research into the long-term effects of technology use on students beyond elementary school.

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One of the most common questions we receive at the Writing Center is “what am I supposed to do in my conclusion?” This is a difficult question to answer because there’s no one right answer to what belongs in a conclusion. How you conclude your paper will depend on where you started—and where you traveled. It will also depend on the conventions and expectations of the discipline in which you are writing. For example, while the conclusion to a STEM paper could focus on questions for further study, the conclusion of a literature paper could include a quotation from your central text that can now be understood differently in light of what has been discussed in the paper. You should consult your instructor about expectations for conclusions in a particular discipline.

With that in mind, here are some general guidelines you might find helpful to use as you think about your conclusion.  

Begin with the “what”  

In a short paper—even a research paper—you don’t need to provide an exhaustive summary as part of your conclusion. But you do need to make some kind of transition between your final body paragraph and your concluding paragraph. This may come in the form of a few sentences of summary. Or it may come in the form of a sentence that brings your readers back to your thesis or main idea and reminds your readers where you began and how far you have traveled.

So, for example, in a paper about the relationship between ADHD and rejection sensitivity, Vanessa Roser begins by introducing readers to the fact that researchers have studied the relationship between the two conditions and then provides her explanation of that relationship. Here’s her thesis: “While socialization may indeed be an important factor in RS, I argue that individuals with ADHD may also possess a neurological predisposition to RS that is exacerbated by the differing executive and emotional regulation characteristic of ADHD.”

In her final paragraph, Roser reminds us of where she started by echoing her thesis: “This literature demonstrates that, as with many other conditions, ADHD and RS share a delicately intertwined pattern of neurological similarities that is rooted in the innate biology of an individual’s mind, a connection that cannot be explained in full by the behavioral mediation hypothesis.”  

Highlight the “so what”  

At the beginning of your paper, you explain to your readers what’s at stake—why they should care about the argument you’re making. In your conclusion, you can bring readers back to those stakes by reminding them why your argument is important in the first place. You can also draft a few sentences that put those stakes into a new or broader context.

In the conclusion to her paper about ADHD and RS, Roser echoes the stakes she established in her introduction—that research into connections between ADHD and RS has led to contradictory results, raising questions about the “behavioral mediation hypothesis.”

She writes, “as with many other conditions, ADHD and RS share a delicately intertwined pattern of neurological similarities that is rooted in the innate biology of an individual’s mind, a connection that cannot be explained in full by the behavioral mediation hypothesis.”  

Leave your readers with the “now what”  

After the “what” and the “so what,” you should leave your reader with some final thoughts. If you have written a strong introduction, your readers will know why you have been arguing what you have been arguing—and why they should care. And if you’ve made a good case for your thesis, then your readers should be in a position to see things in a new way, understand new questions, or be ready for something that they weren’t ready for before they read your paper.

In her conclusion, Roser offers two “now what” statements. First, she explains that it is important to recognize that the flawed behavioral mediation hypothesis “seems to place a degree of fault on the individual. It implies that individuals with ADHD must have elicited such frequent or intense rejection by virtue of their inadequate social skills, erasing the possibility that they may simply possess a natural sensitivity to emotion.” She then highlights the broader implications for treatment of people with ADHD, noting that recognizing the actual connection between rejection sensitivity and ADHD “has profound implications for understanding how individuals with ADHD might best be treated in educational settings, by counselors, family, peers, or even society as a whole.”

To find your own “now what” for your essay’s conclusion, try asking yourself these questions:

  • What can my readers now understand, see in a new light, or grapple with that they would not have understood in the same way before reading my paper? Are we a step closer to understanding a larger phenomenon or to understanding why what was at stake is so important?  
  • What questions can I now raise that would not have made sense at the beginning of my paper? Questions for further research? Other ways that this topic could be approached?  
  • Are there other applications for my research? Could my questions be asked about different data in a different context? Could I use my methods to answer a different question?  
  • What action should be taken in light of this argument? What action do I predict will be taken or could lead to a solution?  
  • What larger context might my argument be a part of?  

What to avoid in your conclusion  

  • a complete restatement of all that you have said in your paper.  
  • a substantial counterargument that you do not have space to refute; you should introduce counterarguments before your conclusion.  
  • an apology for what you have not said. If you need to explain the scope of your paper, you should do this sooner—but don’t apologize for what you have not discussed in your paper.  
  • fake transitions like “in conclusion” that are followed by sentences that aren’t actually conclusions. (“In conclusion, I have now demonstrated that my thesis is correct.”)
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Writing a conclusion for an argumentative essay can be a breaking point for most students. This section is critical to your academic project because it guides your paper to a safe landing. Failing to pay special attention to this part can become your paper’s anticlimax that undoes all your good work. Thus, our essay help service team composed this article to guide you on how to conclude an argumentative essay. It answers critical questions like, “how do you end an argumentative essay?” Read on to learn more tips for crafting a persuasive conclusion for your argumentative papers and improving your writing skills.

How to Write a Good Conclusion For an Argumentative Essay?

An excellent argumentative essay organizes and presents well-reasoned conclusions to make readers agree with them or consider your viewpoint favourably. Therefore, composing a perfect conclusion paragraph for an argumentative essay increases the chances of your piece achieving its primary goal.

Do you still want to master how to write a conclusion for an argumentative essay? Then start by recalling every main argument that defended your thesis. After recollecting these thoughts, summarize them to show how they support your thesis. Afterwards, revisit your paraphrased thesis and findings. Closely consider these issues while drafting a conclusion for this essay type. Except for essential points, concluding an argumentative essay requires considering additional factors:

  • Consider your paper’s writing tone and ensure it is authoritative, calm, and informative.
  • Mind your opening statement to cement the value of what you said and remind your audience of it.
  • Finish your conclusion meaningfully by including a positive final sentence to make readers reflect on your work and act favourably.

Eventually, your conclusion will include the following four primary elements:

  • Restate your topic and show its relevance.
  • Revisit your thesis statement.
  • Address opposing arguments and show readers why they should buy into your viewpoint.
  • Include a call for action or suggest future research possibilities.

According to the simplest essay model, an argumentative essay consists of 3 main parts:

Argumentative essay conclusion

What to Avoid in Argumentative Essay Conclusion Paragraph?

Do you still want to master how to end an argumentative essay? Knowing what to exclude from your argumentative essay conclusion paragraph is necessary. Your conclusion in an argumentative essay is like its landing stage. Like an airplane flight, how you plan to “land” your readers in this closing paragraph can either make or break the entire flight. This closing must be impactful and avoid the following:

  • Introducing New Ideas.  Introducing any new arguments you didn’t discuss in the body paragraphs into this section is a bad idea. Instead, only unify and underscore the importance of your previously discussed thoughts.
  • Starting With Overused Phrases.  Starting with traditional phrases like “in conclusion” or “to wrap it up” is unnecessary. Only use relevant transition words without sounding redundant.
  • Ending With a Quote.  An argumentative essay isn’t a speech. Thus, please don’t end it with a quote, which might do well in the introduction to hook your readers.
  • Hurrying Through the Process.  You might be tempted to rush through this part because you have written the other parts, but don’t give it to the temptation. This section is equally important, and overlooking it can undo the other excellently written sections.
  • Apologizing.  Don’t undermine your paper’s authority and value by apologizing for your position.

Argumentative Essay Conclusion Outline

Just like a synthesis essay outline , a structure helps you write down your research materials, explain your facts, and present your evidence logically. It also makes your drafting process convenient because you won’t forget to include any necessary materials. Thus, you should create an argumentative essay conclusion outline before sitting down to write the assignment. Writing a conclusion for an argumentative essay should comprise the following key elements that make it fulfil its goal.

  • Level the ground for completing your assignment.
  • Restate the thesis with new wordings.
  • Restate your paper’s premise.
  • Summarize your assignment’s major arguments.
  • Convince readers to side with your position.

How to Start a Conclusion For an Argumentative Essay?

Mastering how to end an argument essay requires knowing how to start it. Therefore, open it by summarizing or rephrasing your thesis in a reinvented format. This reinvented format emphasizes its importance and strength. Embark on this portion, knowing it’s your last opportunity to convince your readers to agree with your position.

This opening shows the readers that your thesis matters to them. It paves the way for summarizing the arguments that support the thesis. This successful opening saves you from trying to introduce new thoughts.

How to End an Argumentative Essay?

Ending an argumentative paper shouldn’t be hard if you know how to go about it. Generally, your assignment should end by opening with your thesis to demonstrate to readers that it’s worth agreeing with. Underscoring its value ties up your assignment’s value and relevance before your audience. You must also prove that your chosen subject matters and how it does.

Your closing chapter must also address all opposing views and prove your chosen stand is worthwhile without sounding arrogant or demeaning contrary viewpoints. You must also end with a call to favourable action or recommending possible future research.

Argumentative Essay Conclusion Examples

Nothing inspires your ability to write killer conclusions for argumentative essays more than a well-written argumentative essay conclusion example. Thus, we set this section apart to offer inspiring conclusion examples for an argumentative essay. These models are critical to future tasks because argumentative essays can depend on your moral choices. Sometimes, you may need to appeal to readers’ emotions to drive your points home.

This perfect model addresses all the issues, demolishes opposing “pro-choice” views, and appeals to the reader’s emotions and intellect.

Unborn children’s life is sacred and not a choice a pregnant mother and abortionist doctor gives. It is a fundamental sacred right the law guarantees. Any attempt to deny an unborn child its right to life amounts to denying any other person’s right to life. Further, studies and common sense observation prove that life begins at conception. Otherwise, why do expectant mothers attend prenatal clinics or carry themselves carefully if they know they aren’t carrying delicate, precious lives? Thus, “pro-choice” is a myth and a cover-up for irresponsible sexual behaviour and legalized child sacrifice. It also ignores commonsense facts, such as that refusing to kill an innocent baby is a valid, sensible decision. So, protecting unborn lives is a choice to become a voice for the rights of the voiceless.

This example is good but wordy.

As time flies, tech has transformed how we, as a people, receive and utilize information. The media has greatly influenced how we think, using an increased number of social apps we use daily. The latter affect public opinions and perception, as our study group participants have demonstrated. Most participants confessed that social platforms are their primary information source. Unfortunately, these media platforms get large funds from private entities to filter the information you receive to promote selfish agendas. For this reason, you see view reality and life using their spectacles and produce their desired effect. So, act now to protect free news and truthful information.

This example is sloppy and doesn’t address specific business challenges. It also has redundant opening phrases.

In closing, when you get the golden chance to start a new business, always seize it. Hold board meetings, solve the A, B, and C challenges, and accelerate processes. Business is all about profits and generating more cash. If you opt for a different venture, you will face challenges X, Y, and Z, which exceed the estimated budgetary limits.

Argumentative Essay Conclusion Format

Your argumentative essay conclusion must follow a specific format to enable your thoughts to flow coherently. As a rule of thumb, an excellent concluding format has four main parts that wrap up your argumentative paper well. This part delves deeper into this issue, as discussed below.

  • Revisit your subject and why it matters. This part should answer the “so what?” question. In other words, you should restate your subject’s value to make your readers understand its importance. It should also demonstrate the relevance and significance of your essay’s findings.
  • Recap your thesis. Your paper’s thesis is your primary argument and stand that holds together everything else. Repeat it to give your essay credence and validity.
  • Address opposing viewpoints. This section must address opposing points and show your readers why your position is preferred and worthy of their choice. It must be convincing and appealing to the readers’ emotions and minds to make them see your thesis favourably.
  • Summarize main thoughts. This subsection also summarizes your paper’s primary thoughts. However, don’t rewrite these arguments and reinvent the wheel.
  • A call to favourable action. Your concluding part should contain a call to favourable action and, possibly, a recommendation for further research on the subject.

Need Help With Argumentative Essay Writing?

How to close an argumentative essay is as significant as knowing how to start and continue it. This closing part determines whether your paper achieves its goal or not. It’s your last opportunity to show readers why your position on a given subject is worth your readers’ consideration.

This section can either make or break your paper, depending on how you handle it. Thus, we composed this post to who you how to write a good conclusion for an argumentative essay.

Do you still need more professional help with your essay assignments? Don’t worry because you can use a writer from our expert team. You can benefit from our law essay writing service and other assignment help.

Our writers can handle different essay types for college students at all levels covering all subjects. Go ahead and order your paper today to accelerate your studies. Talk to our team today.

Do you still have questions about how to write an argumentative essay conclusion? Here are the top questions and their answers.

How do you write a conclusion for an argumentative essay?

You write an argument essay conclusion by restating its thesis, summarizing its main points, and addressing opposing opinions.

Do you have conclusion examples for an argumentative essay in the article?

Yes, we have three conclusion paragraph examples for an argumentative essay to show you how a good and shoddy one looks.

What is a conclusion outline for an argumentative essay?

An argumentative essay conclusion format is a wireframe containing and ordering your paper’s ideas. It also helps you easily compose your assignment while allowing readers to read it conveniently.

What to write about in an argumentative essay conclusion?

You should revisit your thesis, recap your ideas, and call for favourable reader action toward your thesis.

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How to Write a Concluding Paragraph for a Persuasive Essay

Last Updated: February 13, 2024 Fact Checked

This article was co-authored by Jake Adams . Jake Adams is an academic tutor and the owner of Simplifi EDU, a Santa Monica, California based online tutoring business offering learning resources and online tutors for academic subjects K-College, SAT & ACT prep, and college admissions applications. With over 14 years of professional tutoring experience, Jake is dedicated to providing his clients the very best online tutoring experience and access to a network of excellent undergraduate and graduate-level tutors from top colleges all over the nation. Jake holds a BS in International Business and Marketing from Pepperdine University. This article has been fact-checked, ensuring the accuracy of any cited facts and confirming the authority of its sources. This article has been viewed 178,499 times.

Jake Adams

Giving an Overview

Step 1 Re-read your paper or paper outline.

  • If it helps, print out a copy of the body of the paper and highlight the main points to be summarized.

Step 2 Summarize your main arguments.

  • For instance, "Gun laws should be changed to reflect the evolving needs of today's generations.”

Step 3 Avoid introducing any new ideas.

  • You can, however, create a call to action or end with a creative and engaging hook statement.

Step 4 Keep it brief.

  • Using the first sentence to restate the hypothesis in your introduction, in different wording
  • Writing the next 2-3 sentence to summarize the key arguments made in your paper
  • Having the last 1-2 sentences be a grand statement of conclusion, saying what your final findings are

Using Convincing Wording

Step 1 Try parallel sentences.

  • For instance, "Regular exercise reduces stress, improves your sleep, and promotes weight loss."

Step 2 Use strong, simple language.

  • For instance, instead of writing, "The traditional American Dream is not dead and gone," write, "The American Dream is not dead.”
  • However, keep in mind that in some cases, more elaborate wording may be necessary to drive home your point.

Step 3 Avoid being obvious.

Establishing the Relevance of Your Conclusion

Step 1 Use the

  • For example,"What will happen to small businesses as different industries continue to go digital?"

Step 2 Put out a call to action to engage your reader in a memorable way.

  • For example, "Being environmentally responsible is a necessary step for all people, in order to save the parts of nature that we have left."

Step 3 Present an ideal picture to improve your reader's relation to the text.

  • For example, "If this competitive nature of school work were replaced with a more community-based learning approach, we might see happier, healthier children."

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  • ↑ Jake Adams. Academic Tutor & Test Prep Specialist. Expert Interview. 20 May 2020.
  • ↑ https://opentextbc.ca/writingforsuccess/chapter/chapter-10-persuasion/
  • ↑ http://penandthepad.com/write-concluding-paragraph-persuasive-essay-college-1412.html
  • ↑ http://examples.yourdictionary.com/parallel-structure-examples.html
  • ↑ http://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/ending-essay-conclusions
  • ↑ https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/general_writing/common_writing_assignments/argument_papers/conclusions.html

About This Article

Jake Adams

To write a concluding paragraph for your persuasive essay, you’ll need to briefly summarize your main arguments. Use the first sentence to restate your hypothesis from your introduction in different words. Then, spend 2 or 3 sentences reminding the reader of the main arguments you made throughout the essay. Use strong, simple language to emphasize your conclusion. You can also add a call to action or tell the reader what you think should happen as a result of your conclusions. For example, "If this competitive nature of school work were replaced with a more community-based learning approach, we might see happier, healthier children." For more tips from our Teaching co-author, including how to position your arguments within the bigger picture, read on! Did this summary help you? Yes No

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Sat / act prep online guides and tips, 3 strong argumentative essay examples, analyzed.

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Need to defend your opinion on an issue? Argumentative essays are one of the most popular types of essays you’ll write in school. They combine persuasive arguments with fact-based research, and, when done well, can be powerful tools for making someone agree with your point of view. If you’re struggling to write an argumentative essay or just want to learn more about them, seeing examples can be a big help.

After giving an overview of this type of essay, we provide three argumentative essay examples. After each essay, we explain in-depth how the essay was structured, what worked, and where the essay could be improved. We end with tips for making your own argumentative essay as strong as possible.

What Is an Argumentative Essay?

An argumentative essay is an essay that uses evidence and facts to support the claim it’s making. Its purpose is to persuade the reader to agree with the argument being made.

A good argumentative essay will use facts and evidence to support the argument, rather than just the author’s thoughts and opinions. For example, say you wanted to write an argumentative essay stating that Charleston, SC is a great destination for families. You couldn’t just say that it’s a great place because you took your family there and enjoyed it. For it to be an argumentative essay, you need to have facts and data to support your argument, such as the number of child-friendly attractions in Charleston, special deals you can get with kids, and surveys of people who visited Charleston as a family and enjoyed it. The first argument is based entirely on feelings, whereas the second is based on evidence that can be proven.

The standard five paragraph format is common, but not required, for argumentative essays. These essays typically follow one of two formats: the Toulmin model or the Rogerian model.

  • The Toulmin model is the most common. It begins with an introduction, follows with a thesis/claim, and gives data and evidence to support that claim. This style of essay also includes rebuttals of counterarguments.
  • The Rogerian model analyzes two sides of an argument and reaches a conclusion after weighing the strengths and weaknesses of each.

3 Good Argumentative Essay Examples + Analysis

Below are three examples of argumentative essays, written by yours truly in my school days, as well as analysis of what each did well and where it could be improved.

Argumentative Essay Example 1

Proponents of this idea state that it will save local cities and towns money because libraries are expensive to maintain. They also believe it will encourage more people to read because they won’t have to travel to a library to get a book; they can simply click on what they want to read and read it from wherever they are. They could also access more materials because libraries won’t have to buy physical copies of books; they can simply rent out as many digital copies as they need.

However, it would be a serious mistake to replace libraries with tablets. First, digital books and resources are associated with less learning and more problems than print resources. A study done on tablet vs book reading found that people read 20-30% slower on tablets, retain 20% less information, and understand 10% less of what they read compared to people who read the same information in print. Additionally, staring too long at a screen has been shown to cause numerous health problems, including blurred vision, dizziness, dry eyes, headaches, and eye strain, at much higher instances than reading print does. People who use tablets and mobile devices excessively also have a higher incidence of more serious health issues such as fibromyalgia, shoulder and back pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, and muscle strain. I know that whenever I read from my e-reader for too long, my eyes begin to feel tired and my neck hurts. We should not add to these problems by giving people, especially young people, more reasons to look at screens.

Second, it is incredibly narrow-minded to assume that the only service libraries offer is book lending. Libraries have a multitude of benefits, and many are only available if the library has a physical location. Some of these benefits include acting as a quiet study space, giving people a way to converse with their neighbors, holding classes on a variety of topics, providing jobs, answering patron questions, and keeping the community connected. One neighborhood found that, after a local library instituted community events such as play times for toddlers and parents, job fairs for teenagers, and meeting spaces for senior citizens, over a third of residents reported feeling more connected to their community. Similarly, a Pew survey conducted in 2015 found that nearly two-thirds of American adults feel that closing their local library would have a major impact on their community. People see libraries as a way to connect with others and get their questions answered, benefits tablets can’t offer nearly as well or as easily.

While replacing libraries with tablets may seem like a simple solution, it would encourage people to spend even more time looking at digital screens, despite the myriad issues surrounding them. It would also end access to many of the benefits of libraries that people have come to rely on. In many areas, libraries are such an important part of the community network that they could never be replaced by a simple object.

The author begins by giving an overview of the counter-argument, then the thesis appears as the first sentence in the third paragraph. The essay then spends the rest of the paper dismantling the counter argument and showing why readers should believe the other side.

What this essay does well:

  • Although it’s a bit unusual to have the thesis appear fairly far into the essay, it works because, once the thesis is stated, the rest of the essay focuses on supporting it since the counter-argument has already been discussed earlier in the paper.
  • This essay includes numerous facts and cites studies to support its case. By having specific data to rely on, the author’s argument is stronger and readers will be more inclined to agree with it.
  • For every argument the other side makes, the author makes sure to refute it and follow up with why her opinion is the stronger one. In order to make a strong argument, it’s important to dismantle the other side, which this essay does this by making the author's view appear stronger.
  • This is a shorter paper, and if it needed to be expanded to meet length requirements, it could include more examples and go more into depth with them, such as by explaining specific cases where people benefited from local libraries.
  • Additionally, while the paper uses lots of data, the author also mentions their own experience with using tablets. This should be removed since argumentative essays focus on facts and data to support an argument, not the author’s own opinion or experiences. Replacing that with more data on health issues associated with screen time would strengthen the essay.
  • Some of the points made aren't completely accurate , particularly the one about digital books being cheaper. It actually often costs a library more money to rent out numerous digital copies of a book compared to buying a single physical copy. Make sure in your own essay you thoroughly research each of the points and rebuttals you make, otherwise you'll look like you don't know the issue that well.

body_argue

Argumentative Essay Example 2

There are multiple drugs available to treat malaria, and many of them work well and save lives, but malaria eradication programs that focus too much on them and not enough on prevention haven’t seen long-term success in Sub-Saharan Africa. A major program to combat malaria was WHO’s Global Malaria Eradication Programme. Started in 1955, it had a goal of eliminating malaria in Africa within the next ten years. Based upon previously successful programs in Brazil and the United States, the program focused mainly on vector control. This included widely distributing chloroquine and spraying large amounts of DDT. More than one billion dollars was spent trying to abolish malaria. However, the program suffered from many problems and in 1969, WHO was forced to admit that the program had not succeeded in eradicating malaria. The number of people in Sub-Saharan Africa who contracted malaria as well as the number of malaria deaths had actually increased over 10% during the time the program was active.

One of the major reasons for the failure of the project was that it set uniform strategies and policies. By failing to consider variations between governments, geography, and infrastructure, the program was not nearly as successful as it could have been. Sub-Saharan Africa has neither the money nor the infrastructure to support such an elaborate program, and it couldn’t be run the way it was meant to. Most African countries don't have the resources to send all their people to doctors and get shots, nor can they afford to clear wetlands or other malaria prone areas. The continent’s spending per person for eradicating malaria was just a quarter of what Brazil spent. Sub-Saharan Africa simply can’t rely on a plan that requires more money, infrastructure, and expertise than they have to spare.

Additionally, the widespread use of chloroquine has created drug resistant parasites which are now plaguing Sub-Saharan Africa. Because chloroquine was used widely but inconsistently, mosquitoes developed resistance, and chloroquine is now nearly completely ineffective in Sub-Saharan Africa, with over 95% of mosquitoes resistant to it. As a result, newer, more expensive drugs need to be used to prevent and treat malaria, which further drives up the cost of malaria treatment for a region that can ill afford it.

Instead of developing plans to treat malaria after the infection has incurred, programs should focus on preventing infection from occurring in the first place. Not only is this plan cheaper and more effective, reducing the number of people who contract malaria also reduces loss of work/school days which can further bring down the productivity of the region.

One of the cheapest and most effective ways of preventing malaria is to implement insecticide-treated bed nets (ITNs).  These nets provide a protective barrier around the person or people using them. While untreated bed nets are still helpful, those treated with insecticides are much more useful because they stop mosquitoes from biting people through the nets, and they help reduce mosquito populations in a community, thus helping people who don’t even own bed nets.  Bed nets are also very effective because most mosquito bites occur while the person is sleeping, so bed nets would be able to drastically reduce the number of transmissions during the night. In fact, transmission of malaria can be reduced by as much as 90% in areas where the use of ITNs is widespread. Because money is so scarce in Sub-Saharan Africa, the low cost is a great benefit and a major reason why the program is so successful. Bed nets cost roughly 2 USD to make, last several years, and can protect two adults. Studies have shown that, for every 100-1000 more nets are being used, one less child dies of malaria. With an estimated 300 million people in Africa not being protected by mosquito nets, there’s the potential to save three million lives by spending just a few dollars per person.

Reducing the number of people who contract malaria would also reduce poverty levels in Africa significantly, thus improving other aspects of society like education levels and the economy. Vector control is more effective than treatment strategies because it means fewer people are getting sick. When fewer people get sick, the working population is stronger as a whole because people are not put out of work from malaria, nor are they caring for sick relatives. Malaria-afflicted families can typically only harvest 40% of the crops that healthy families can harvest. Additionally, a family with members who have malaria spends roughly a quarter of its income treatment, not including the loss of work they also must deal with due to the illness. It’s estimated that malaria costs Africa 12 billion USD in lost income every year. A strong working population creates a stronger economy, which Sub-Saharan Africa is in desperate need of.  

This essay begins with an introduction, which ends with the thesis (that malaria eradication plans in Sub-Saharan Africa should focus on prevention rather than treatment). The first part of the essay lays out why the counter argument (treatment rather than prevention) is not as effective, and the second part of the essay focuses on why prevention of malaria is the better path to take.

  • The thesis appears early, is stated clearly, and is supported throughout the rest of the essay. This makes the argument clear for readers to understand and follow throughout the essay.
  • There’s lots of solid research in this essay, including specific programs that were conducted and how successful they were, as well as specific data mentioned throughout. This evidence helps strengthen the author’s argument.
  • The author makes a case for using expanding bed net use over waiting until malaria occurs and beginning treatment, but not much of a plan is given for how the bed nets would be distributed or how to ensure they’re being used properly. By going more into detail of what she believes should be done, the author would be making a stronger argument.
  • The introduction of the essay does a good job of laying out the seriousness of the problem, but the conclusion is short and abrupt. Expanding it into its own paragraph would give the author a final way to convince readers of her side of the argument.

body_basketball-3

Argumentative Essay Example 3

There are many ways payments could work. They could be in the form of a free-market approach, where athletes are able to earn whatever the market is willing to pay them, it could be a set amount of money per athlete, or student athletes could earn income from endorsements, autographs, and control of their likeness, similar to the way top Olympians earn money.

Proponents of the idea believe that, because college athletes are the ones who are training, participating in games, and bringing in audiences, they should receive some sort of compensation for their work. If there were no college athletes, the NCAA wouldn’t exist, college coaches wouldn’t receive there (sometimes very high) salaries, and brands like Nike couldn’t profit from college sports. In fact, the NCAA brings in roughly $1 billion in revenue a year, but college athletes don’t receive any of that money in the form of a paycheck. Additionally, people who believe college athletes should be paid state that paying college athletes will actually encourage them to remain in college longer and not turn pro as quickly, either by giving them a way to begin earning money in college or requiring them to sign a contract stating they’ll stay at the university for a certain number of years while making an agreed-upon salary.  

Supporters of this idea point to Zion Williamson, the Duke basketball superstar, who, during his freshman year, sustained a serious knee injury. Many argued that, even if he enjoyed playing for Duke, it wasn’t worth risking another injury and ending his professional career before it even began for a program that wasn’t paying him. Williamson seems to have agreed with them and declared his eligibility for the NCAA draft later that year. If he was being paid, he may have stayed at Duke longer. In fact, roughly a third of student athletes surveyed stated that receiving a salary while in college would make them “strongly consider” remaining collegiate athletes longer before turning pro.

Paying athletes could also stop the recruitment scandals that have plagued the NCAA. In 2018, the NCAA stripped the University of Louisville's men's basketball team of its 2013 national championship title because it was discovered coaches were using sex workers to entice recruits to join the team. There have been dozens of other recruitment scandals where college athletes and recruits have been bribed with anything from having their grades changed, to getting free cars, to being straight out bribed. By paying college athletes and putting their salaries out in the open, the NCAA could end the illegal and underhanded ways some schools and coaches try to entice athletes to join.

People who argue against the idea of paying college athletes believe the practice could be disastrous for college sports. By paying athletes, they argue, they’d turn college sports into a bidding war, where only the richest schools could afford top athletes, and the majority of schools would be shut out from developing a talented team (though some argue this already happens because the best players often go to the most established college sports programs, who typically pay their coaches millions of dollars per year). It could also ruin the tight camaraderie of many college teams if players become jealous that certain teammates are making more money than they are.

They also argue that paying college athletes actually means only a small fraction would make significant money. Out of the 350 Division I athletic departments, fewer than a dozen earn any money. Nearly all the money the NCAA makes comes from men’s football and basketball, so paying college athletes would make a small group of men--who likely will be signed to pro teams and begin making millions immediately out of college--rich at the expense of other players.

Those against paying college athletes also believe that the athletes are receiving enough benefits already. The top athletes already receive scholarships that are worth tens of thousands per year, they receive free food/housing/textbooks, have access to top medical care if they are injured, receive top coaching, get travel perks and free gear, and can use their time in college as a way to capture the attention of professional recruiters. No other college students receive anywhere near as much from their schools.

People on this side also point out that, while the NCAA brings in a massive amount of money each year, it is still a non-profit organization. How? Because over 95% of those profits are redistributed to its members’ institutions in the form of scholarships, grants, conferences, support for Division II and Division III teams, and educational programs. Taking away a significant part of that revenue would hurt smaller programs that rely on that money to keep running.

While both sides have good points, it’s clear that the negatives of paying college athletes far outweigh the positives. College athletes spend a significant amount of time and energy playing for their school, but they are compensated for it by the scholarships and perks they receive. Adding a salary to that would result in a college athletic system where only a small handful of athletes (those likely to become millionaires in the professional leagues) are paid by a handful of schools who enter bidding wars to recruit them, while the majority of student athletics and college athletic programs suffer or even shut down for lack of money. Continuing to offer the current level of benefits to student athletes makes it possible for as many people to benefit from and enjoy college sports as possible.

This argumentative essay follows the Rogerian model. It discusses each side, first laying out multiple reasons people believe student athletes should be paid, then discussing reasons why the athletes shouldn’t be paid. It ends by stating that college athletes shouldn’t be paid by arguing that paying them would destroy college athletics programs and cause them to have many of the issues professional sports leagues have.

  • Both sides of the argument are well developed, with multiple reasons why people agree with each side. It allows readers to get a full view of the argument and its nuances.
  • Certain statements on both sides are directly rebuffed in order to show where the strengths and weaknesses of each side lie and give a more complete and sophisticated look at the argument.
  • Using the Rogerian model can be tricky because oftentimes you don’t explicitly state your argument until the end of the paper. Here, the thesis doesn’t appear until the first sentence of the final paragraph. That doesn’t give readers a lot of time to be convinced that your argument is the right one, compared to a paper where the thesis is stated in the beginning and then supported throughout the paper. This paper could be strengthened if the final paragraph was expanded to more fully explain why the author supports the view, or if the paper had made it clearer that paying athletes was the weaker argument throughout.

body_birdfight

3 Tips for Writing a Good Argumentative Essay

Now that you’ve seen examples of what good argumentative essay samples look like, follow these three tips when crafting your own essay.

#1: Make Your Thesis Crystal Clear

The thesis is the key to your argumentative essay; if it isn’t clear or readers can’t find it easily, your entire essay will be weak as a result. Always make sure that your thesis statement is easy to find. The typical spot for it is the final sentence of the introduction paragraph, but if it doesn’t fit in that spot for your essay, try to at least put it as the first or last sentence of a different paragraph so it stands out more.

Also make sure that your thesis makes clear what side of the argument you’re on. After you’ve written it, it’s a great idea to show your thesis to a couple different people--classmates are great for this. Just by reading your thesis they should be able to understand what point you’ll be trying to make with the rest of your essay.

#2: Show Why the Other Side Is Weak

When writing your essay, you may be tempted to ignore the other side of the argument and just focus on your side, but don’t do this. The best argumentative essays really tear apart the other side to show why readers shouldn’t believe it. Before you begin writing your essay, research what the other side believes, and what their strongest points are. Then, in your essay, be sure to mention each of these and use evidence to explain why they’re incorrect/weak arguments. That’ll make your essay much more effective than if you only focused on your side of the argument.

#3: Use Evidence to Support Your Side

Remember, an essay can’t be an argumentative essay if it doesn’t support its argument with evidence. For every point you make, make sure you have facts to back it up. Some examples are previous studies done on the topic, surveys of large groups of people, data points, etc. There should be lots of numbers in your argumentative essay that support your side of the argument. This will make your essay much stronger compared to only relying on your own opinions to support your argument.

Summary: Argumentative Essay Sample

Argumentative essays are persuasive essays that use facts and evidence to support their side of the argument. Most argumentative essays follow either the Toulmin model or the Rogerian model. By reading good argumentative essay examples, you can learn how to develop your essay and provide enough support to make readers agree with your opinion. When writing your essay, remember to always make your thesis clear, show where the other side is weak, and back up your opinion with data and evidence.

What's Next?

Do you need to write an argumentative essay as well?  Check out our guide on the best argumentative essay topics for ideas!

You'll probably also need to write research papers for school.  We've got you covered with 113 potential topics for research papers.

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Christine graduated from Michigan State University with degrees in Environmental Biology and Geography and received her Master's from Duke University. In high school she scored in the 99th percentile on the SAT and was named a National Merit Finalist. She has taught English and biology in several countries.

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Argumentative Essay Conclusion - Write a Strong Concluding Paragraph

If you're reading this article, chances are you have been given an assignment that involves writing. And, that's the argumentative one. An argumentative essay does include some basic elements found in other types of academic papers, but here, we'll focus on its conclusion. After reading this article, you'll learn how to write a strong essay conclusion for a text with an argumentative implication.

As always, it's useful to recall that an argumentative essay consists of the introduction, body, and that element we're going to discuss in detail. All of these sections should be organized well and be developed around the main idea of your assignment . An introduction prepares grounds for your ideas, your essay body provides all necessary details and supporting evidence, and an argumentative essay conclusion is the last chance for you to defend a point and strengthen a final impression. All these elements ensure a logical flow and interconnection of the ideas discussed. And, to finish the writing well, it is important to know the standards and requirements of the essay's last part.

So, why is it necessary to have a conclusion in your argumentative essay? First, without it, the entire assignment will appear incomplete. Recall listening to a piece of music or song which abruptly comes to an end, or reading a book that ends in a cliffhanger. That would leave a bad taste in the mouths of those reading your paper or make the audience think poorly of the author's writing skills. Not only is the conclusion an obligatory part of any assignment, but it also brings wholeness to each of those. You may think of it as the last piece of a jigsaw puzzle: whatever is depicted in it, without that last piece, it's still incomplete. Also, a conclusion in the argumentative essay can highlight the central idea once again. That will not only help you end the writing logically but show your attention to details and competence in academic standards.

When people read lengthy argumentative essays, they can easily lose their bearings. One can use too many ideas, counterarguments, or evidence. A concluding paragraph helps the reader sort of "refresh" the whole text in their minds. That said, it isn't merely a mechanical task of summarizing the central points. The essence of doing so is even more meaningful and powerful - it can help to understand and draw connections between the issues under discussion. So, you write an argumentative conclusion to expand your readers' outlook, providing them with some relevant ideas or points they may have missed or never thought about.

Conclusions are significant for all types of papers. And, the process of writing one can be a hurdle for college students . That's because a lot more is expected from them in terms of the complexity of arguments, the use of advanced grammar, relevant references, and length of a written work. In light of this, it makes sense to offer you useful insights into how to write an argumentative essay conclusion.

Argumentative Essay Conclusion Writing

There is no best way to end an argumentative essay. The process of writing the conclusion is just as creative and subjective as that of working on other paragraphs of the work. However, some crucial elements should be included here. An argumentative essay requires you to repeat the thesis statement (optional), make the audience believe that the arguments made are valid, and cross all the T's.

Here are 3 simple steps involved in writing a good argumentative conclusion:

  • Writing an outline
  • Opening the conclusion
  • Closing the conclusion

What follows next are some effective ways to accomplish the above-mentioned stages and achieve a well-written text. To start a concluding paragraph, you may want to do the following:

  • Use a transition. Introduce the conclusion in a sequential way. The transition could be a phrase of varying length that somehow mentions previous ideas from the preceding paragraph.
  • Creatively reiterate your thesis statement without being verbatim (i.e., writing it word for word). Consider the following essay conclusion example: Recently, much has been said about the appropriateness of breastfeeding in public places. However, it would not be improper to state that women who choose to do so should neglect the fact that by exposing themselves in public, they run the risk of being shamed, judged, or even sexually abused.

The highlighted part of the above sentences is a possible creative restatement of the main thesis. That can be as follows: Nursing mothers should be able to breastfeed their babies in public places without the fear of being shamed or intimidated.

To end the argumentative conclusion, consider using one of the methods below:

  • End with a question. Closing your essay on a high note is a good way to make your reader want to look into the issues debated. Another way of doing so implies asking a question that invites the audience to analyze the subject beyond the aspects discussed. The question could be a rhetorical one and emphasize the importance of your argument. Here are some examples: If it's normal for a relationship to be like this, would you allow yourself or your sister to be on the receiving end of such abuse? or Would you let your child, who's a mere 5 years away from entering adulthood, be subjected to such strenuous labor to make ends meet?
  • Conclude by introducing a relevant but not-so-obvious idea. That will help you create the effect of surprise, reveal something new, and provide the reader with a fresh outlook frame on the issue. Given its application in space travel and abundance of water on Earth (70% of Earth is made up of water), hydrogen as a fuel source could usher in environmentally-friendly vehicles within the next three decades!

Keep in mind that our examples are just templates. If you're writing an argument essay on a different topic, you need to come up with ideas relevant to it.

Argumentative Essay Conclusion Outline

In this section, we'll talk about the outline and give you some advice. This element lists the content of your essay - it can cover the whole text or its part. You may wonder why it's necessary to create an outline for a conclusion. The answer is simple - it helps you figure out how the last paragraph is organized and interconnected with the rest of the writing.

Remember that an outline is only a tool, but a very useful one. Unless you are a versatile and experienced writer, you may have some trouble writing a compelling essay without this element. The outline for an argumentative conclusion can be compared to a skeleton or foundation. Just as a skeleton gives shape and support to the body, it provides form and logical flow to your essay conclusion. Let's look through the following example:

  • Transition. Mention the key idea or thesis in a sequence.
  • Connection. Pick a sentence or two from the body that can support your central idea (use facts).
  • Closing Words. Expand the issue by asking a related question to provoke ideas in the readers' minds.

The example above clearly serves as a foundation upon which the argumentative concluding paragraph can be formulated. Remember - the argumentative essay conclusion isn't for new ideas. Stick to your main questions and make sure your arguments are relevant.

If you have any difficulties or issues with writing your essays, don't hesitate to contact us and receive professional support. Our skilled writers and expert support agents are always ready to help you by creating assignments that will meet your student needs!

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3 Steps to Write Good Argumentative Essay Conclusions

Table of Contents

Argumentative essays need to be compelling. They must convince the reader to take the author’s side and understand their argument is valid. And what better way to seal the deal for your essay than with a  good argumentative essay conclusion ?

In this article, we’ll discuss three quick steps to help you write a powerful conclusion to your argumentative essay. We’ve also listed some essential tips that you should keep in mind. Let’s get right into it!

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Why Your Essay Conclusion Is So Important

An argumentative essay’s conclusion is essential, as it conveys the final impression you leave with your reader . Its goal is to present the thesis, summarize the essay’s body, and leave readers with the last impression.

Here are some of the other things that a conclusion does for your essay:

  • Give your readers something to think about after reading your paper.
  • Provides a sense of completeness to your essay.
  • Relates the evidence you have collected to your thesis statement. It states the significance of the essay, along with evidence to support it.

The goal is not to introduce new ideas but to summarise your writing. Your conclusion will be your last chance to make any final points, so you need to make it count.

Three Steps to Write a Good Argumentative Essay Conclusion

A  good argumentative essay conclusion  builds off your work in the introductory paragraph. It also supports the claims you made in the body paragraphs . You can use quotes, statistics, or details from your research to weave the conclusion paragraph together.

Here are three key steps for concluding your argumentative essay:

Restate the thesis

The thesis statement is typically the most crucial phrase in the entire essay. This is usually in the last sentence of your introduction paragraph. A thesis statement sums up the argumentative essay’s whole purpose. It also includes evidence to support it.

Restate your thesis statement in your conclusion to remind readers of your main argument. But don’t copy it directly. The thesis statement should instead be rewritten and reapplied within the conclusion. This helps summarize the paper and allows your argument to remain with the reader after they’ve finished reading.

Summarize the supporting paragraphs

An author should summarize the body paragraphs of the argumentative essay after restating the thesis. If the thesis statement explains what the author is trying to prove, the body paragraphs contain evidence that supports it.

A summary of the evidence contained within the body paragraphs effectively drives home your point. The argument becomes more convincing to the reader as it offers valid evidence in its favor.

Create a final and general statement

Finally, end your conclusion with a general statement. This statement could be a rhetorical question or a broad implication. It will help promote active thinking about the essay topic.

Key Aspects to Remember When Writing a Conclusion

Now that you know how to write a good argumentative essay conclusion, remember these few quick things:

  • Conclusions should restate, not rewrite, your thesis from the introduction.
  • Conclusions in an essay should consist of three sentences minimum. It should conclude your thoughts and not present any new ideas. 
  • In the conclusion paragraph, the entire paper should be summarized. Credible evidence supporting the thesis statement should be included. Ensure that this summary contains essential information in the essay. 

Your essay conclusion can either makes the reader accept your argument or reject it. Make it short, concise, and to the point. You may also choose to include a call to action. Your conclusion should get to the point and give the reader something to ponder.

3 Steps to Write Good Argumentative Essay Conclusions

Abir Ghenaiet

Abir is a data analyst and researcher. Among her interests are artificial intelligence, machine learning, and natural language processing. As a humanitarian and educator, she actively supports women in tech and promotes diversity.

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How to Write a Conclusion Paragraph for Argumentative Papers

  • by Lesley V.
  • November 20, 2023

If you want to know how to write a conclusion for an argumentative essay, you’ll have to start by understanding  why  each academic paper needs this paragraph. 

Let’s learn more about its purpose and structure.

(And don’t miss examples!)

Argumentative Essay Conclusion: Purpose

We all know that a conclusion is the final paragraph of any essay. Why is it so essential, especially for argumentative essays? 

The purpose is to  persuade readers  that your points on the topic are valid when you write such a paper. A concluding paragraph isn’t just a summary but a clue, gluing all components and bringing home the final argument.

In other words, it is a perfect opportunity to let your readers understand why your essay is worth reading and thinking about.

Below, you’ll learn how to achieve this effect.

Writing a Conclusion for Argumentative Essay

To create a good conclusion, ensure to include three parts there.

The first sentence must restate your thesis in light of what you’ve discovered through your arguments. Next, summarize those arguments and finish with the final statement. Let’s look at each of these components in more detail.

argumentative-essay-conclusion-structure

1. Restate Your Thesis

A thesis is one of the first things you write in your argumentative essay conclusion outline, and that’s because it’s like the heart of your essay. Restate it in conclusion, having created a more persuasive version. 

For example:

2. Summarize Arguments

It’s the second sentence of your conclusion where you retell the  arguments from the body paragraphs . In the example, you can see the summary that should match at least two points:

  • The first one describes the king’s mistakes;
  • The second one elaborates on how the people reacted.

Here’s what it looks like:

“The king is afraid to look unclever because he cannot see ‘the magical clothes’ offered by fraud, and the comical situations continue because nobody is brave enough to tell him about the issue.”

3. Provide a Final Statement

The last sentence of your essay should answer the  “So what?”  question [1].

Use some points from the essay body to support your claim. Just be careful not to introduce any new information there! In the below example, the final statement aims at strengthening the essay by describing how we can use the fairy tale’s lesson in our everyday lives.

“The very name of this fairy tale has become proverbial, especially for journalists who want to emphasize severe issues with a single phrase.”

Argumentative Essay Conclusion Paragraph: Examples

I’ve decided to provide you with five more examples of different argumentative essay conclusions so that you understand the purpose and structure.

Here’s a conclusion explaining a single argument:

It is a conclusion to an essay arguing that drinking Coca-Cola has no benefits:

And this argumentative essay conclusion proves that interval fasting is healthy:

In this conclusion, there’s an analysis of the opposing arguments:

Finally, here goes a similar conclusion on the same topic but without mentioning any opposing arguments:

5 Don’ts of Writing Argumentative Conclusions

It’s great when you can impressively conclude your essay, but there are some things you should never do when writing your final paragraph.

  • Don’t forget to review your arguments before wrapping up.  You need to reread your entire essay and, perhaps, correct some logical fallacies before writing the conclusion. Otherwise, it will be harder to fix later.
  • Never start without rereading your thesis statement . Some students skip the introduction when reviewing their papers and jump directly to the body paragraphs. It’s a terrible strategy since the first sentence of your conclusion is all about the thesis statement.
  • Don’t underestimate the effectiveness of simple formulations . Many students want their final paragraphs to sound extra persuasive and try to achieve that effect with fancy words. However, a perfect conclusion is simple and straightforward, conveying the main point of your essay.
  • Never introduce new information or quotes in your final paragraph . It’s a mistake you might make by accident. All the information in your conclusion should be just a recap, not new materials.
  • Don’t rush . Complete other parts before writing the final paragraph. Even if you have a brilliant idea for your thesis restatement while writing your essay’s body, it’s better to hold that thought. Otherwise, your paper might become incoherent.

Can I end an essay with a question?

When writing an academic essay, you can’t end it with a question. The best way to approach the ending of your university paper is by following the standard structure for the conclusion. Whether it’s an argumentative piece or any other type, a question doesn’t work as a final touch.

How to start a conclusion for an argumentative essay?

Start by restating your thesis. Repeat your main idea in light of what you’ve discovered in the body paragraphs. That way, your readers will not lose sight of your goal. Instead, they’ll follow along with your findings naturally.

How long is an essay conclusion?

If your essay is one page long, your conclusion should be no shorter than four lines and three sentences. You can add more information  for longer papers  to explain your final thoughts. Nevertheless, it’s critical to keep the length of your conclusion (as well as the introduction) to a minimum.

How to End an Argumentative Essay: Takeaways

As you can see, the proper format and good ideas are essential for a great conclusion to an argumentative essay. Please note that your primary goal is persuading your readers that your main thought is valid and worth considering. Occasionally, you might address some opposing viewpoints [2] but introduce no new information in your conclusion.

Remember these main principles, follow the standard structure, and you’ll do a great job, by all means!

References:

  • https://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/conclusions

2. https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/general_writing/common_writing_assignments/argument_papers/conclusions.html

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How to Write a Conclusion for an Argumentative Essay: All Tips

Table of contents

  • 1 What to Write in the Conclusion for an Argumentative Essay
  • 2.1 Know how to structure your paper
  • 3 How to Start the Conclusion of an Essay?
  • 4.1 Example 1
  • 4.2 Example 2
  • 4.3 Example 3
  • 4.4 Examples 4, 5
  • 5 How to Finish an Argumentative Project Conclusion Paragraph

Want to write a perfect conclusion for your paper but don’t know how? Everyone has been there, and it’s never easy. It is the final part of your writing, so by the time you reach it, you have no energy and can’t focus.

Still, the conclusion part is crucial for the success of every paper. You have to give the final answer to the audience by restating your thesis and noting your claims and findings. If you think you can’t write one, you’d better buy an argumentative essay online and solve your problems.

In this article, you will find everything you need to know about a conclusion to an argumentative essay and how to write it.

What to Write in the Conclusion for an Argumentative Essay

To write a conclusion argumentative essay, you first need to recall all the key points of your writing. The college argumentative essay outline you have written can significantly assist you in this. After you have noted these points, you should restate your rephrased thesis and findings.

Except for those basic points, knowing how to conclude an argumentative essay also requires a few more things:

The first thing to pay attention to is your tone of writing. Make sure it is authoritative yet calm and informative. This way, you will assure readers that your work is essential for the case.

Next is your first sentence. How you start your conclusion does matter. You need to state what you did and why. That will remind the readers once again about what they have read.

After you write it, you will need to point out the key findings of your writing. You must note the important evidence you have written about in your paper. Keep it brief and connect them to your text conclusion.

The last step is to finish the conclusion of your argumentative essay in a meaningful way. Ensure a positive final sentence to make the reader reflect on your work and make them act.

Thus, writing a conclusion for an argumentative essay is a complex process. It can be not easy to come up with a good conclusion on your own, so don’t hesitate to seek essay assistance if you need it. Once again, no matter what kind of conclusion you write, it is crucial to have a good one. That goes even for argumentative essays, where you can write everything straight as it is. You can be assertive and direct without considering whether the reader will like your argument. Still, you must keep a good transition between the sections and stick to the basic structure and rules.

Author Note: Make sure not to present any new arguments or claims in the conclusion. This section of your paper is your final opinion. Writing further details, ideas, or irrelevant findings can ruin the text.

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How to Format the Conclusion of an Argumentative Essay?

To format a conclusion, you have to follow a well-established standard. The best argumentative essay conclusion example includes a “lead” (opening statement). Then point out one vital factor from your paragraph. Usually, one point per paragraph, no more, or it will get too bulky. Finally, add an appropriate finale that will serve as a smooth exit of the whole paper, the final sentence.

By using the standard format, you will have an easier time when you have to write an argumentative essay conclusion. You can focus on the facts and tailor them to appeal to readers. That will re-convince them about your point for the case.

Here we can add that the final sentence should not always be smooth and friendly. When your conclusion tone is assertive, write the final part of the finale as a call to action—an attempt to affect the reader and make them want to research. To find out more about the matter or even take a stand with their own opinion.

Know how to structure your paper

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  • double-spaced (275 words/page) / single-spaced (550 words/page)
  • 0.5″ first line of a paragraph

Knowing the exact way to structure a conclusion in an argumentative essay is crucial. Someone may say that it is not important. But this is one of the first things people pay attention to. So, you have to format the paper and its main points properly. In any assignment, the style of the text adheres to strict requirements. Usually, you can find them by asking your professor or checking the educational institution’s website.

In that sense, you must stick to proper formatting when writing a perfect argumentative essay . To get the best grade, you have to use the  recommended formatting style , which can be APA, AP, or other. So remember, following the proper structure and formatting can make the critical points of your work stand out. As a result, your paper will look better, and your paper results will score higher.

Writing a perfect conclusion for your paper can be difficult, especially when you have no energy and can’t focus. Fortunately, PapersOwl.com is here to help. Our experienced writers can provide you with an excellent conclusion for your paper so that you can confidently submit it.

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How to Start the Conclusion of an Essay?

A conclusion to an argumentative essay must go through various steps. The foremost will be the entry sentence. Then, restate your main idea and critical points from your writing. You can add a question or two, but it depends on the flow of your text. Note how it reads and make sure everything sounds smooth, and the transition is flawless.

Note: You should check your outline for significant findings or arguments. Do that before starting with the first sentence of your conclusion. Make sure not to miss important facts or add new ones by mistake.

Essay Conclusion Examples

If you are still trying to figure out what your conclusion should look like, check below. We have prepared how-to-end argumentative essay examples . These can give you an idea about the structure and format of your paper’s final point.

In this particular sample, the case is about global warming. So, the essay’s conclusion has to give a compelling reason why the reader and the public should act and prevent the issue. You must remember that what you write depends on the type of paper and should be unique.

“Throughout our text, we pointed out findings about the impact of global warming. Nature cannot sustain itself in the ever-changing climate. The ice caps melt, and the shorelines deteriorate, thus causing the extinction of both flora and fauna. Due to the persisting crisis, we must take action and use the best methods to protect the future of our planet.”

Some papers involve public policies and morals. In such cases, you must write in a tone that will feel morally right but will support and justify your arguments. Usually, you write such papers when your topic is pointing towards persuasion. Below, you can see an argumentative essay conclusion example for such texts.

“As time goes on, technology has changed how we, as a society, receive and use information. Media’s influence has been increasing throughout the social applications we use daily. The said impacts public opinion, as we can see from the participants in our study group. Most have stated that their primary information source is social media. These media get large funds from private entities to filter your content. This way, you see their ideas and become part of their audience. If you like your news free of filtering and want truthful information, you must act now and ensure your rights.”
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At one point or another, you will get an assignment to help with your career objectives. Usually, it is connected to your writing as you have to research specific matters. For example, bring out your point of view and make conclusions. You can quickly implement such tasks in essays like the argumentative one. Thus, you have to be ready to write a conclusion of an argumentative essay that can fit well and is decisive.

“Often, when you get the opportunity to launch a new business, you must grab it. Plan business meetings, solve the x, y, and z obstacles, and speed up the process. Business is about profit, producing more revenue, and creating an easily manageable structure. If you choose to act on a different undertaking, there will be risks a or b, which can lead to overstepping the estimated budgets.”

Examples 4, 5

As seen, the conclusion of an argumentative essay can depend on your moral choices. In other cases, on a figure of speech and even sensitivity towards an issue. So, some good argumentative essay topics need an emotional appeal to the reader.

Good conclusion paragraph examples for an argumentative essay can be about any topic. They can be something like whether abortion is a fundamental right for women. In such essay cases, your moral perspective plays a considerable role. But, no matter your point, it is crucial to state your ideas without offending anyone else.

“The right to give birth or not is fundamental for women. They must have it ensured. Otherwise, they have no control or option in their social relationships. The analysis showcases how an unwanted pregnancy can influence and determine the life of a young woman and her child. So without guaranteed rights, women are forced to use dangerous methods to retake ownership of their body, and that must change.” “Life is not a choice given by someone. It is a fundamental right guaranteed by the law. In that sense, denying an unborn child’s right to life is identical to denying any other person’s rights. Furthermore, studies have long proven that life begins with its inception. Therefore, carrying out policies of pro-choice is like murder. With that in mind, saving the unborn by speaking out for them is like giving their rights a voice.”

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How to Finish an Argumentative Project Conclusion Paragraph

How to end an argumentative essay? The answer is a strong finishing line. The final sentence is what will leave a deep impression on your reader. Usually, we finish it smoothly in a cordial tone. It must be in a way that will make the reader think about the case or take some action. In other cases, the call to action is intense. It could be smoother, but its main goal is to influence the audience to contemplate and act.

Taking into consideration the importance of the last sentence, you must write it correctly. Remember that its point is to move the reader, but at the same time to explain why. It should look like, “ If we don’t do it now, we won’t be able to act in the future. ” If your sentence cuts the flow of the whole text, it will not appeal to your reader. If you are having trouble crafting the perfect conclusion for your argumentative essay, you can always pay for essay help from a professional writer to get the job done right.

Now you understand how to write a conclusion for an argumentative essay, but remember to catch up on the whole paper flow and finish it in the same tone. Use the call to action sentence and exit your essay smoothly while giving the readers ideas and making them think about the case. If you can’t, please check our argumentative essay writing services , which can easily tackle the task. Note that by getting it done by a professional, you can learn from examples. Besides, the text can get done in a few hours.

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How to Write an Argumentative Essay

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50 Argumentative Essay Topics

Illustration by Catherine Song. ThoughtCo. 

  • M.Ed., Education Administration, University of Georgia
  • B.A., History, Armstrong State University

An argumentative essay requires you to decide on a topic and take a position on it. You'll need to back up your viewpoint with well-researched facts and information as well. One of the hardest parts is deciding which topic to write about, but there are plenty of ideas available to get you started.

Choosing a Great Argumentative Essay Topic

Students often find that most of their work on these essays is done before they even start writing. This means that it's best if you have a general interest in your subject, otherwise you might get bored or frustrated while trying to gather information. (You don't need to know everything, though.) Part of what makes this experience rewarding is learning something new.

It's best if you have a general interest in your subject, but the argument you choose doesn't have to be one that you agree with.

The subject you choose may not necessarily be one that you are in full agreement with, either. You may even be asked to write a paper from the opposing point of view. Researching a different viewpoint helps students broaden their perspectives. 

Ideas for Argument Essays

Sometimes, the best ideas are sparked by looking at many different options. Explore this list of possible topics and see if a few pique your interest. Write those down as you come across them, then think about each for a few minutes.

Which would you enjoy researching? Do you have a firm position on a particular subject? Is there a point you would like to make sure to get across? Did the topic give you something new to think about? Can you see why someone else may feel differently?

50 Possible Topics

A number of these topics are rather controversial—that's the point. In an argumentative essay, opinions matter and controversy is based on opinions, which are, hopefully, backed up by facts.   If these topics are a little too controversial or you don't find the right one for you, try browsing through persuasive essay and speech topics  as well.

  • Is global climate change  caused by humans?
  • Is the death penalty effective?
  • Is our election process fair?
  • Is torture ever acceptable?
  • Should men get paternity leave from work?
  • Are school uniforms beneficial?
  • Do we have a fair tax system?
  • Do curfews keep teens out of trouble?
  • Is cheating out of control?
  • Are we too dependent on computers?
  • Should animals be used for research?
  • Should cigarette smoking be banned?
  • Are cell phones dangerous?
  • Are law enforcement cameras an invasion of privacy?
  • Do we have a throwaway society?
  • Is child behavior better or worse than it was years ago?
  • Should companies market to children?
  • Should the government have a say in our diets?
  • Does access to condoms prevent teen pregnancy?
  • Should members of Congress have term limits?
  • Are actors and professional athletes paid too much?
  • Are CEOs paid too much?
  • Should athletes be held to high moral standards?
  • Do violent video games cause behavior problems?
  • Should creationism be taught in public schools?
  • Are beauty pageants exploitative ?
  • Should English be the official language of the United States?
  • Should the racing industry be forced to use biofuels?
  • Should the alcohol drinking age be increased or decreased?
  • Should everyone be required to recycle?
  • Is it okay for prisoners to vote (as they are in some states)?
  • Is it good that same-sex couples are able to marry?
  • Are there benefits to attending a single-sex school ?
  • Does boredom lead to trouble?
  • Should schools be in session year-round ?
  • Does religion cause war?
  • Should the government provide health care?
  • Should abortion be illegal?
  • Are girls too mean to each other?
  • Is homework harmful or helpful?
  • Is the cost of college too high?
  • Is college admission too competitive?
  • Should euthanasia be illegal?
  • Should the federal government legalize marijuana use nationally ?
  • Should rich people be required to pay more taxes?
  • Should schools require foreign language or physical education?
  • Is affirmative action fair?
  • Is public prayer okay in schools?
  • Are schools and teachers responsible for low test scores?
  • Is greater gun control a good idea?
  • Preparing an Argument Essay: Exploring Both Sides of an Issue
  • Controversial Speech Topics
  • Tips on How to Write an Argumentative Essay
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  • 25 Essay Topics for American Government Classes
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  • MBA Essay Tips
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  • How to Write a Narrative Essay or Speech
  • 61 General Expository Essay Topic Ideas to Practice Academic Writing
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  • How to write an essay introduction | 4 steps & examples

How to Write an Essay Introduction | 4 Steps & Examples

Published on February 4, 2019 by Shona McCombes . Revised on July 23, 2023.

A good introduction paragraph is an essential part of any academic essay . It sets up your argument and tells the reader what to expect.

The main goals of an introduction are to:

  • Catch your reader’s attention.
  • Give background on your topic.
  • Present your thesis statement —the central point of your essay.

This introduction example is taken from our interactive essay example on the history of Braille.

The invention of Braille was a major turning point in the history of disability. The writing system of raised dots used by visually impaired people was developed by Louis Braille in nineteenth-century France. In a society that did not value disabled people in general, blindness was particularly stigmatized, and lack of access to reading and writing was a significant barrier to social participation. The idea of tactile reading was not entirely new, but existing methods based on sighted systems were difficult to learn and use. As the first writing system designed for blind people’s needs, Braille was a groundbreaking new accessibility tool. It not only provided practical benefits, but also helped change the cultural status of blindness. This essay begins by discussing the situation of blind people in nineteenth-century Europe. It then describes the invention of Braille and the gradual process of its acceptance within blind education. Subsequently, it explores the wide-ranging effects of this invention on blind people’s social and cultural lives.

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Table of contents

Step 1: hook your reader, step 2: give background information, step 3: present your thesis statement, step 4: map your essay’s structure, step 5: check and revise, more examples of essay introductions, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about the essay introduction.

Your first sentence sets the tone for the whole essay, so spend some time on writing an effective hook.

Avoid long, dense sentences—start with something clear, concise and catchy that will spark your reader’s curiosity.

The hook should lead the reader into your essay, giving a sense of the topic you’re writing about and why it’s interesting. Avoid overly broad claims or plain statements of fact.

Examples: Writing a good hook

Take a look at these examples of weak hooks and learn how to improve them.

  • Braille was an extremely important invention.
  • The invention of Braille was a major turning point in the history of disability.

The first sentence is a dry fact; the second sentence is more interesting, making a bold claim about exactly  why the topic is important.

  • The internet is defined as “a global computer network providing a variety of information and communication facilities.”
  • The spread of the internet has had a world-changing effect, not least on the world of education.

Avoid using a dictionary definition as your hook, especially if it’s an obvious term that everyone knows. The improved example here is still broad, but it gives us a much clearer sense of what the essay will be about.

  • Mary Shelley’s  Frankenstein is a famous book from the nineteenth century.
  • Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is often read as a crude cautionary tale about the dangers of scientific advancement.

Instead of just stating a fact that the reader already knows, the improved hook here tells us about the mainstream interpretation of the book, implying that this essay will offer a different interpretation.

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Next, give your reader the context they need to understand your topic and argument. Depending on the subject of your essay, this might include:

  • Historical, geographical, or social context
  • An outline of the debate you’re addressing
  • A summary of relevant theories or research about the topic
  • Definitions of key terms

The information here should be broad but clearly focused and relevant to your argument. Don’t give too much detail—you can mention points that you will return to later, but save your evidence and interpretation for the main body of the essay.

How much space you need for background depends on your topic and the scope of your essay. In our Braille example, we take a few sentences to introduce the topic and sketch the social context that the essay will address:

Now it’s time to narrow your focus and show exactly what you want to say about the topic. This is your thesis statement —a sentence or two that sums up your overall argument.

This is the most important part of your introduction. A  good thesis isn’t just a statement of fact, but a claim that requires evidence and explanation.

The goal is to clearly convey your own position in a debate or your central point about a topic.

Particularly in longer essays, it’s helpful to end the introduction by signposting what will be covered in each part. Keep it concise and give your reader a clear sense of the direction your argument will take.

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how to write a good conclusion for argumentative essay

As you research and write, your argument might change focus or direction as you learn more.

For this reason, it’s often a good idea to wait until later in the writing process before you write the introduction paragraph—it can even be the very last thing you write.

When you’ve finished writing the essay body and conclusion , you should return to the introduction and check that it matches the content of the essay.

It’s especially important to make sure your thesis statement accurately represents what you do in the essay. If your argument has gone in a different direction than planned, tweak your thesis statement to match what you actually say.

To polish your writing, you can use something like a paraphrasing tool .

You can use the checklist below to make sure your introduction does everything it’s supposed to.

Checklist: Essay introduction

My first sentence is engaging and relevant.

I have introduced the topic with necessary background information.

I have defined any important terms.

My thesis statement clearly presents my main point or argument.

Everything in the introduction is relevant to the main body of the essay.

You have a strong introduction - now make sure the rest of your essay is just as good.

  • Argumentative
  • Literary analysis

This introduction to an argumentative essay sets up the debate about the internet and education, and then clearly states the position the essay will argue for.

The spread of the internet has had a world-changing effect, not least on the world of education. The use of the internet in academic contexts is on the rise, and its role in learning is hotly debated. For many teachers who did not grow up with this technology, its effects seem alarming and potentially harmful. This concern, while understandable, is misguided. The negatives of internet use are outweighed by its critical benefits for students and educators—as a uniquely comprehensive and accessible information source; a means of exposure to and engagement with different perspectives; and a highly flexible learning environment.

This introduction to a short expository essay leads into the topic (the invention of the printing press) and states the main point the essay will explain (the effect of this invention on European society).

In many ways, the invention of the printing press marked the end of the Middle Ages. The medieval period in Europe is often remembered as a time of intellectual and political stagnation. Prior to the Renaissance, the average person had very limited access to books and was unlikely to be literate. The invention of the printing press in the 15th century allowed for much less restricted circulation of information in Europe, paving the way for the Reformation.

This introduction to a literary analysis essay , about Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein , starts by describing a simplistic popular view of the story, and then states how the author will give a more complex analysis of the text’s literary devices.

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is often read as a crude cautionary tale. Arguably the first science fiction novel, its plot can be read as a warning about the dangers of scientific advancement unrestrained by ethical considerations. In this reading, and in popular culture representations of the character as a “mad scientist”, Victor Frankenstein represents the callous, arrogant ambition of modern science. However, far from providing a stable image of the character, Shelley uses shifting narrative perspectives to gradually transform our impression of Frankenstein, portraying him in an increasingly negative light as the novel goes on. While he initially appears to be a naive but sympathetic idealist, after the creature’s narrative Frankenstein begins to resemble—even in his own telling—the thoughtlessly cruel figure the creature represents him as.

If you want to know more about AI tools , college essays , or fallacies make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples or go directly to our tools!

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  • Appeal to authority fallacy
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Your essay introduction should include three main things, in this order:

  • An opening hook to catch the reader’s attention.
  • Relevant background information that the reader needs to know.
  • A thesis statement that presents your main point or argument.

The length of each part depends on the length and complexity of your essay .

The “hook” is the first sentence of your essay introduction . It should lead the reader into your essay, giving a sense of why it’s interesting.

To write a good hook, avoid overly broad statements or long, dense sentences. Try to start with something clear, concise and catchy that will spark your reader’s curiosity.

A thesis statement is a sentence that sums up the central point of your paper or essay . Everything else you write should relate to this key idea.

The thesis statement is essential in any academic essay or research paper for two main reasons:

  • It gives your writing direction and focus.
  • It gives the reader a concise summary of your main point.

Without a clear thesis statement, an essay can end up rambling and unfocused, leaving your reader unsure of exactly what you want to say.

The structure of an essay is divided into an introduction that presents your topic and thesis statement , a body containing your in-depth analysis and arguments, and a conclusion wrapping up your ideas.

The structure of the body is flexible, but you should always spend some time thinking about how you can organize your essay to best serve your ideas.

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  2. Writing A Good Conclusion For An Argumentative Essay

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  3. How to Write a Strong Conclusion Paragraph in an Argumentative Essay

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COMMENTS

  1. How to Conclude an Essay

    Step 1: Return to your thesis To begin your conclusion, signal that the essay is coming to an end by returning to your overall argument. Don't just repeat your thesis statement —instead, try to rephrase your argument in a way that shows how it has been developed since the introduction. Example: Returning to the thesis

  2. Conclusions

    The preacher's maxim is one of the most effective formulas to follow for argument papers: Tell what you're going to tell them (introduction). Tell them (body). Tell them what you told them (conclusion).

  3. How to Write an Argumentative Essay

    When do you write an argumentative essay? You might be assigned an argumentative essay as a writing exercise in high school or in a composition class. The prompt will often ask you to argue for one of two positions, and may include terms like "argue" or "argument." It will frequently take the form of a question.

  4. Writing Conclusion for Argumentative Essays [Guide & Examples]

    Restating the Thesis Statement: start by revisiting your thesis statement. This doesn't mean copying it word for word from your introduction, but rather, paraphrasing it in a new light. Given the evidence and arguments you've presented, this reaffirms your position and reminds your reader of the claim you've defended.

  5. How to Write a Conclusion for an Essay

    1 Restate your thesis As you set out to write your conclusion and end your essay on an insightful note, you'll want to start by restating your thesis. Since the thesis is the central idea of your entire essay, it's wise to remind the reader of the purpose of your paper.

  6. How to Write a Conclusion for an Argumentative Essay

    Emphasize the Significance of Your Arguments. The conclusion of your essay is a good place to highlight the importance of your argument and the implications of your findings. Briefly explain why your essay topic is significant and how your perspective relates to the wider context. For example, if you're writing on the rising cost of medicine ...

  7. Conclusions

    At the beginning of your paper, you explain to your readers what's at stake—why they should care about the argument you're making. In your conclusion, you can bring readers back to those stakes by reminding them why your argument is important in the first place. You can also draft a few sentences that put those stakes into a new or ...

  8. How to Write a Strong Essay Conclusion

    Scribbr 314K subscribers Subscribe Subscribed 442K views 2 years ago How to Write an A-grade Essay In this video, you'll learn how to write a strong essay conclusion paragraph that ties...

  9. How to Write a Good Argumentative Essay: Easy Step-by-Step Guide

    Rather than introducing new facts or more arguments, a good conclusion will appeal to a reader's emotions. In some cases, writers will use a personal anecdote explaining how the topic personally affects them. How to Write a Thesis Statement in 3 Steps

  10. Argumentative Essay Conclusion

    How do you write a good conclusion for an essay? After the thesis has been restated, the author should summarize the body paragraphs of the argumentative essay.A final, general...

  11. How to Write a Standout Argumentative Essay

    3 Drafting: Write a rough draft of your essay. It helps to include any data and direct quotes as early as possible, especially with argumentative essays that often cite outside sources. 4 Revising: Polish your rough draft, optimize word choice, and restructure your arguments if necessary. Make sure your language is clear and appropriate for the ...

  12. How to Write a Good Conclusion For an Argumentative Essay?

    An excellent argumentative essay organizes and presents well-reasoned conclusions to make readers agree with them or consider your viewpoint favourably. Therefore, composing a perfect conclusion paragraph for an argumentative essay increases the chances of your piece achieving its primary goal.

  13. 3 Ways to Write a Concluding Paragraph for a Persuasive Essay

    A good concluding paragraph for a paper should summarize your hypothesis and all your key arguments in about 3-5 sentences. Use parallel sentences and simple language, and avoid being obvious. Establish the importance of your conclusion by looking at the topic within a bigger context, presenting an ideal picture, and calling your reader to action.

  14. 3 Strong Argumentative Essay Examples, Analyzed

    A good argumentative essay will use facts and evidence to support the argument, rather than just the author's thoughts and opinions. For example, say you wanted to write an argumentative essay stating that Charleston, SC is a great destination for families.

  15. Argumentative Essay Conclusion

    There is no best way to end an argumentative essay. The process of writing the conclusion is just as creative and subjective as that of working on other paragraphs of the work. However, some crucial elements should be included here.

  16. How to Form an Argumentative Essay Outline

    It focuses on the six elements that make up a good argument: claim (thesis), grounds (data and reasons), warrants, backings, qualifiers, and rebuttals. The argumentative essay outline example below shows the recommended order in which to put these elements: I. Introduction. A. Open with a hook, if you can, to garner interest

  17. 3 Steps to Write Good Argumentative Essay Conclusions

    Three Steps to Write a Good Argumentative Essay Conclusion. Restate the thesis. Summarize the supporting paragraphs. Create a final and general statement. Key Aspects to Remember When Writing a Conclusion. Conclusion. Argumentative essays need to be compelling. They must convince the reader to take the author's side and understand their ...

  18. How to Write a Conclusion (With Tips and Examples)

    How to write a conclusion. An effective conclusion is created by following these steps: 1. Restate the thesis. An effective conclusion brings the reader back to the main point, reminding the reader of the purpose of the essay. However, avoid repeating the thesis verbatim. Paraphrase your argument slightly while still preserving the primary point.

  19. How to Write a Conclusion for an Argumentative Essay

    Writing a Conclusion for Argumentative Essay. To create a good conclusion, ensure to include three parts there. The first sentence must restate your thesis in light of what you've discovered through your arguments. Next, summarize those arguments and finish with the final statement.

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  21. 50 Compelling Argumentative Essay Topics

    In an argumentative essay, opinions matter and controversy is based on opinions, which are, hopefully, backed up by facts. If these topics are a little too controversial or you don't find the right one for you, try browsing through persuasive essay and speech topics as well. Is global climate change caused by humans? Is the death penalty effective?

  22. 125 Strong Argumentative Essay Topics For Your Next Paper

    There are three key elements of a good argumentative essay: a strong argument, thesis and comprehensive research. Strong argument To write a compelling essay that persuades your reader, start with a strong argument. Start with a topic that you feel strongly about and construct an argument with reasons and proof.

  23. How to Write an Essay Introduction

    Step 1: Hook your reader. Step 2: Give background information. Step 3: Present your thesis statement. Step 4: Map your essay's structure. Step 5: Check and revise. More examples of essay introductions. Other interesting articles. Frequently asked questions about the essay introduction.