Discourse, debate, and analysis

Cambridge re:think essay competition 2024.

Competition Opens: 15th January, 2024

Essay Submission Deadline: 10th May, 2024 Result Announcement: 25th June, 2024 Award Ceremony and Dinner at the University of Cambridge: 30th July, 2024

We welcome talented high school students from diverse educational settings worldwide to contribute their unique perspectives to the competition.

Entry to the competition is free.

About the Competition

The spirit of the Re:think essay competition is to encourage critical thinking and exploration of a wide range of thought-provoking and often controversial topics. The competition covers a diverse array of subjects, from historical and present issues to speculative future scenarios. Participants are invited to engage deeply with these topics, critically analysing their various facets and implications. It promotes intellectual exploration and encourages participants to challenge established norms and beliefs, presenting opportunities to envision alternative futures, consider the consequences of new technologies, and reevaluate longstanding traditions. 

Ultimately, our aim is to create a platform for students and scholars to share their perspectives on pressing issues of the past and future, with the hope of broadening our collective understanding and generating innovative solutions to contemporary challenges. This year’s competition aims to underscore the importance of discourse, debate, and critical analysis in addressing complex societal issues in nine areas, including:

Religion and Politics

Political science and law, linguistics, environment, sociology and philosophy, business and investment, public health and sustainability, biotechonology.

Artificial Intelligence 

Neuroengineering

2024 essay prompts.

This year, the essay prompts are contributed by distinguished professors from Harvard, Brown, UC Berkeley, Cambridge, Oxford, and MIT.

Essay Guidelines and Judging Criteria

Review general guidelines, format guidelines, eligibility, judging criteria.

Awards and Award Ceremony

Award winners will be invited to attend the Award Ceremony and Dinner hosted at the King’s College, University of Cambridge. The Dinner is free of charge for select award recipients.

Registration and Submission

Register a participant account today and submit your essay before the deadline.

Advisory Committee and Judging Panel

The Cambridge Re:think Essay Competition is guided by an esteemed Advisory Committee comprising distinguished academics and experts from elite universities worldwide. These committee members, drawn from prestigious institutions, such as Harvard, Cambridge, Oxford, and MIT, bring diverse expertise in various disciplines.

They play a pivotal role in shaping the competition, contributing their insights to curate the themes and framework. Their collective knowledge and scholarly guidance ensure the competition’s relevance, academic rigour, and intellectual depth, setting the stage for aspiring minds to engage with thought-provoking topics and ideas.

We are honoured to invite the following distinguished professors to contribute to this year’s competition.

The judging panel of the competition comprises leading researchers and professors from Harvard, MIT, Stanford, Cambridge, and Oxford, engaging in a strictly double blind review process.

Essay Competition Professors

Why has religion remained a force in a secular world? 

Professor Commentary:

Arguably, the developed world has become more secular in the last century or so. The influence of Christianity, e.g. has diminished and people’s life worlds are less shaped by faith and allegiance to Churches. Conversely, arguments have persisted that hold that we live in a post-secular world. After all, religion – be it in terms of faith, transcendence, or meaning – may be seen as an alternative to a disenchanted world ruled by entirely profane criteria such as economic rationality, progressivism, or science. Is the revival of religion a pale reminder of a by-gone past or does it provide sources of hope for the future?

‘Religion in the Public Sphere’ by Jürgen Habermas (European Journal of Philosophy, 2006)

In this paper, philosopher Jürgen Habermas discusses the limits of church-state separation, emphasizing the significant contribution of religion to public discourse when translated into publicly accessible reasons.

‘Public Religions in the Modern World’ by José Casanova (University Of Chicago Press, 1994)

Sociologist José Casanova explores the global emergence of public religion, analyzing case studies from Catholicism and Protestantism in Spain, Poland, Brazil, and the USA, challenging traditional theories of secularization.

‘The Power of Religion in the Public Sphere’ by Judith Butler, Jürgen Habermas, Charles Taylor, and Cornel West (Edited by Eduardo Mendieta and Jonathan VanAntwerpen, Columbia University Press, 2011)

This collection features dialogues by prominent intellectuals on the role of religion in the public sphere, examining various approaches and their impacts on cultural, social, and political debates.

‘Rethinking Secularism’ by Craig Calhoun, Mark Juergensmeyer, and Jonathan VanAntwerpen (Oxford University Press, 2011)

An interdisciplinary examination of secularism, this book challenges traditional views, highlighting the complex relationship between religion and secularism in contemporary global politics.

‘God is Back: How the Global Rise of Faith is Changing the World’ by John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge (Penguin, 2010)

Micklethwait and Wooldridge argue for the coexistence of religion and modernity, suggesting that religious beliefs can contribute to a more open, tolerant, and peaceful modern world.

‘Multiculturalism’ by Tariq Modood (Polity Press, 2013)

Sociologist Tariq Modood emphasizes the importance of multiculturalism in integrating diverse identities, particularly in post-immigration contexts, and its role in shaping democratic citizenship.

‘God’s Agents: Biblical Publicity in Contemporary England’ by Matthew Engelke (University of California Press, 2013)

In this ethnographic study, Matthew Engelke explores how a group in England seeks to expand the role of religion in the public sphere, challenging perceptions of religion in post-secular England.

Ccir Essay Competition Prompt Contributed By Dr Mashail Malik

Gene therapy is a medical approach that treats or prevents disease by correcting the underlying genetic problem. Is gene therapy better than traditional medicines? What are the pros and cons of using gene therapy as a medicine? Is gene therapy justifiable?

Especially after Covid-19 mRNA vaccines, gene therapy is getting more and more interesting approach to cure. That’s why that could be interesting to think about. I believe that students will enjoy and learn a lot while they are investigating this topic.

Ccir Essay Competition Prompt Contributed By Dr Mamiko Yajima

The Hall at King’s College, Cambridge

The Hall was designed by William Wilkins in the 1820s and is considered one of the most magnificent halls of its era. The first High Table dinner in the Hall was held in February 1828, and ever since then, the splendid Hall has been where members of the college eat and where formal dinners have been held for centuries.

The Award Ceremony and Dinner will be held in the Hall in the evening of  30th July, 2024.

2

Stretching out down to the River Cam, the Back Lawn has one of the most iconic backdrop of King’s College Chapel. 

The early evening reception will be hosted on the Back Lawn with the iconic Chapel in the background (weather permitting). 

3

King’s College Chapel

With construction started in 1446 by Henry VI and took over a century to build, King’s College Chapel is one of the most iconic buildings in the world, and is a splendid example of late Gothic architecture. 

Attendees are also granted complimentary access to the King’s College Chapel before and during the event. 

Frequently Asked Questions

Why should I participate in the Re:think essay competition? 

The Re:think Essay competition is meant to serve as fertile ground for honing writing skills, fostering critical thinking, and refining communication abilities. Winning or participating in reputable contests can lead to recognition, awards, scholarships, or even publication opportunities, elevating your academic profile for college applications and future endeavours. Moreover, these competitions facilitate intellectual growth by encouraging exploration of diverse topics, while also providing networking opportunities and exposure to peers, educators, and professionals. Beyond accolades, they instil confidence, prepare for higher education demands, and often allow you to contribute meaningfully to societal conversations or causes, making an impact with your ideas.

Who is eligible to enter the Re:think essay competition?  

As long as you’re currently attending high school, regardless of your location or background, you’re eligible to participate. We welcome students from diverse educational settings worldwide to contribute their unique perspectives to the competition.

Is there any entry fee for the competition? 

There is no entry fee for the competition. Waiving the entry fee for our essay competition demonstrates CCIR’s dedication to equity. CCIR believes everyone should have an equal chance to participate and showcase their talents, regardless of financial circumstances. Removing this barrier ensures a diverse pool of participants and emphasises merit and creativity over economic capacity, fostering a fair and inclusive environment for all contributors.

Subscribe for Competition Updates

If you are interested to receive latest information and updates of this year’s competition, please sign up here.

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INTERNATIONAL ESSAY COMPETITION

Win a 100% Scholarship Award to our Oxford University Summer Programme!

Winners receive a unique 100% Scholarship Award to our  Oxford University Summer Programme! All outstanding Shortlisted Entries receive partial scholarships or credits for exclusive online courses.

February 19th 2024 Submission Deadline

Image by Unseen Studio

Register here to receive the essay questions and entry details

Register below to access our essay categories, a full list of essay questions, competition guidance and support!

Click here to download free Essay Competition Guidance

Welcome to our prestigious International Essay Competition. At Avernus Education, we are thrilled to provide a platform for young minds to showcase their prowess in Medicine, Engineering, Law, Economics, Psychology, History and Politics. These varied subject categories underscore the importance of interdisciplinary study, a crucial foundation for future leaders in our increasingly interconnected world.

Winners receive an exclusive Avernus Education Scholarship worth over £5000 - granting them free entrance to our exclusive summer camp at Oxford University! Outstanding Runners Up receive 5 hours worth of Credits for Avernus Education courses, conferences and tutoring services.

All those shortlisted receive a signed Certificate of Completion and a written reference upon request.

Why should you participate?

Win  Scholarships: Winners of the International Essay Competition receive a unique 100% Scholarship Award to our  Oxford University Summer Programme! All Shortlisted Entries receive partial scholarships or credits for online courses.

Showcase Your Knowledge: Dive deep into your chosen subject and present your insights to a global audience. Enhance your academic portfolio by exploring a particular subject area in depth, developing your understanding and knowledge beyond the curriculum.

Boost Your Academic Profile: A win or participation can be a standout feature on your academic and University application profile, particularly for competitive UK Universities (such as Oxbridge and the G5).

Critical Thinking Development: The essay topics are designed to stimulate critical thinking and analytical skills. By dissecting complex issues and formulating well-reasoned arguments, students sharpen their cognitive abilities.

Networking Opportunities: Winners and participants get the chance to interact with fellow students, educators, and professionals in the field. These interactions can lead to lasting connections that might be beneficial in future academic or professional endeavors. All those shortlisted will become part of the Avernus Alumni network, with future invite to conferences and events.

Typing on laptop

How to apply?

Each applicant is allowed to submit only ONE essay.

The word limits for the essays are as follows:

Senior applicants: The essay should be between 1300 and 1800 words.

Junior applicants: The essay should be between 1000 and 1200 words.

The essay must be submitted in PDF format.

The essay should be typed in Times New Roman font, with a 12-point size and double-spaced.

It is important to ensure that the essay is original and free from plagiarism. This includes not using any 'Chatbots' to generate or assist in writing the essay.

If any citations are used in the essay, they should be properly referenced according to a recognized citation style (e.g., APA, MLA, Chicago).

The essay must be written in English.

The deadline for submitting the essay is Monday, 19th February 2024.

Please contact a member of our team if you wish for further guidance on completing your essay, or if you have any questions at all.

Welcome to the competition. We look forward to reading your entry!

educational competition essay

Avernus Education is not affiliated to the University of Oxford, nor their constituent colleges

The Best Essay Writing Contests of 2024

Writing competitions curated by Reedsy

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Manage a competition? Submit it here

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We made a writing app for you

Yes, you! Write. Format. Export for ebook and print. 100% free, always.

Showing 46 contests

Anthology travel writing competition 2024.

Anthology Magazine

The Anthology Travel Writing Competition is open to original and previously unpublished travel articles in the English language by writers of any nationality, living anywhere in the world. We are looking for an engaging article that will capture the reader’s attention, conveying a strong sense of the destination and the local culture. Max 1000 words.

Entry requirements

Deadline: November 30, 2024

Essay, Non-fiction, Travel

International Voices in Creative Nonfiction Competition

Vine Leaves Press

Small presses have potential for significant impact, and at Vine Leaves Press, we take this responsibility quite seriously. It is our responsibility to give marginalized groups the opportunity to establish literary legacies that feel rich and vast. Why? To sustain hope for the world to become a more loving, tolerable, and open space. It always begins with art. That is why we have launched this writing competition.

Additional prizes

Book publication

Deadline: July 01, 2024

Essay, Memoir, Non-fiction, Novel

Young Sports Journalist 2024

The Young Sports Journalist Competition, 2024, seeks well-argued articles from aspiring journalists aged 14-21. Winning entries will be published online and printed in the Summer Issue of Pitch. Critiqued by our panel of accomplished judges, winners will also receive a £50 cash prize and offered work experience here at PITCH HQ. The competition runs from 7 February 2024 to 5 April 2024. And winners will be announced in May.

Publication in magazine and online

💰 Fee: FREE

Deadline: April 05, 2024

Essay, Non-fiction

Tusculum Review Nonfiction Chapbook Prize

The Tusculum Review

A prize of $1,000, publication of the essay in The Tusculum Review’s 20th Anniversary Issue (2024), and creation of a limited edition stand-alone chapbook with original art is awarded. Editors of The Tusculum Review and contest judge Mary Cappello will determine the winner of the 2024 prize.

Publication

Deadline: June 15, 2024

Creative Nonfiction Prize

Indiana Review

Send us one creative nonfiction piece, up to 5000 words, for a chance at $1000 + publication. This year's contest will be judged by Lars Horn.

Deadline: March 31, 2024

Essay, Fiction, Non-fiction

High School Academic Research Competition

Columbia Undergraduate Science Journal

The High School Academic Research Competition is where talented students from around the world compete to publish high-quality research on any topic. SARC challenges students to sharpen their critical thinking skills, immerse themselves in the research process, and hone their writing skills for success.

Indigo Research Intensive Summer Program

Deadline: March 20, 2024

Annual Student Essay Contest

Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum

For this year’s Essay Contest, we are asking students to think about why the story of the Oklahoma City bombing is important today.

Deadline: March 04, 2024

Solas Awards

Best Travel Writing

Extraordinary stories about travel and the human spirit have been the cornerstones of our books since 1993. With the Solas Awards we honor writers whose work inspires others to explore. We’re looking for the best stories about travel and the world. Funny, illuminating, adventurous, uplifting, scary, inspiring, poignant stories that reflect the unique alchemy that occurs when you enter unfamiliar territory and begin to see the world differently as a result. We hope these awards will be a catalyst for those who love to leave home and tell others about it.

Deadline: September 21, 2024

Annual Contest Submissions

So To Speak

So To Speak is seeking submissions for poetry, fiction, and non-fiction with an intersectional feminist lens! It is no secret that the literary canon and literary journals are largely comprised of heteronormative, patriarchal, cisgender, able-bodied white men. So to Speak seeks work by writers, poets, and artists who want to challenge and change the identity of the “canonical” writer.

Deadline: March 15, 2024

Essay, Fiction, Flash Fiction, LGBTQ, Non-fiction, Poetry

Brink Literary Journal Award for Hybrid Writing

The Brink Literary Journal Award for Hybrid Writing will be administered to the winner of a literary contest designed to champion innovative hybrid and cross-genre work.

Deadline: February 16, 2024 (Expired)

Essay, Fantasy, Fiction, Humor, Memoir, Non-fiction, Poetry, Science Writing, Short Story

Rigel 2024: $500 for Prose, Poetry, Art, or Graphic Novel

Sunspot Literary Journal

Literary or genre works accepted. Winner receives $500 plus publication, while runners-up and finalists are offered publication. No restrictions on theme or category. Closes: February 29. Entry fee: $12.50. Enter as many times as you like through Submittable or Duotrope

$500 + publication

Runners-up and finalists are offered publication

Deadline: February 29, 2024

Essay, Fiction, Flash Fiction, Memoir, Non-fiction, Novel, Novella, Poetry, Script Writing, Short Story

Military Anthology: Partnerships, the Untold Story

Armed Services Arts Partnership

Partners are an integral aspect of military life, at home and afar, during deployment and after homecoming. Partnerships drive military action and extend beyond being a battle buddy, wingman, or crew member. Some are planned while others arise entirely unexpectedly. Spouses, family, old or new friends, community, faith leaders, and medical specialists all support the military community. Despite their importance, the stories of these partnerships often go untold. This anthology aims to correct that: We will highlight the nuances, surprises, joy, sorrow, heroism, tears, healing power, and ache of partnerships. We invite you to submit the story about partnerships from your journey, so we can help tell it.

$500 Editors' Choice award

$250 for each genre category (prose, poetry, visual art)

Deadline: March 01, 2024

Essay, Fiction, Flash Fiction, Humor, Memoir, Non-fiction, Poetry, Short Story

Stories of Inspiration

Kinsman Avenue Publishing, Inc

Nonfiction stories of inspiration wanted (between 500 to 2,000 words). Submissions should highlight the struggle and resilience of the human spirit, especially related to cultures of BIPOC or marginalized communities. Stories must be original, unpublished works in English. One successful entry will be awarded each month from April 2024 and will be included within Kinsman Quarterly’s online journal and digital magazine. Successful authors receive $200 USD and publication in our digital magazine. No entry fee required.

Publication in Kinsman Quarterly's online magazine

Deadline: December 31, 2024

NOWW 26th International Writing Contest

Northwestern Ontario Writers Workshop (NOWW)

Open to all writers in four categories: poetry, short fiction, creative nonfiction, and critical writing.

2nd: $100 | 3rd: $50

Essay, Fiction, Non-fiction, Poetry, Short Story

Vocal Challenges

Enter themed storytelling contests to put your creativity to the test and be in with a chance of winning cash prizes and more. To submit, you'll need to sign up for a monthly fee of $9.99, or $4.99/month for 3 months.

$1,000 — $5,000

Deadline: March 07, 2024

Essay, Fiction, Memoir, Non-fiction, Short Story

Great American Think-Off

New York Mills Regional Cultural Center

The Great American Think-Off is an exhibition of civil disagreement between powerful ideas that connect to your life at the gut level. The Cultural Center, located in the rural farm and manufacturing town of New York Mills, sponsors this annual philosophy contest.

Deadline: April 01, 2024

The Hudson Prize

Black Lawrence Press

Each year Black Lawrence Press will award The Hudson Prize for an unpublished collection of poems or prose. The prize is open to new, emerging, and established writers.

Irene Adler Prize

Lucas Ackroyd

I’ve traveled the world from Sweden to South Africa, from the Golden Globes to the Olympic women’s hockey finals. I’ve photographed a mother polar bear and her cubs and profiled stars like ABBA, Jennifer Garner and Katarina Witt. And I couldn’t have done it without women. I’ve been very fortunate, and it’s time for me to give back. With the Irene Adler Prize, I’m awarding a $1,000 scholarship to a woman pursuing a degree in journalism, creative writing, or literature at a recognized post-secondary institution.

2x honorable mentions: $250

Deadline: May 30, 2024

Killer Nashville Silver Falchion Award

Killer Nashville

The Killer Nashville Silver Falchion Award is committed to discovering new writers, as well as superlative books by established authors and, upon discovery, sharing those writers and their works with new readers. There are a large number of both fiction and non-fiction categories you can enter.

Crime, Essay, Fantasy, Fiction, Humor, Memoir, Mystery, Non-fiction, Novel, Poetry, Science Fiction, Script Writing, Short Story, Thriller

World Historian Student Essay Competition

World History Association

The World Historian Student Essay Competition is an international competition open to students enrolled in grades K–12 in public, private, and parochial schools, and those in home-study programs. Membership in the World History Association is not a requirement for submission. Past winners may not compete in the same category again.

Deadline: May 01, 2024

Children's, Essay

100 Word Writing Contest

Tadpole Press

Can you write a story using 100 words or less? Pieces will be judged on creativity, uniqueness, and how the story captures a new angle, breaks through stereotypes, and expands our beliefs about what's possible or unexpectedly delights us. In addition, we are looking for writing that is clever or unique, inspires us, and crafts a compelling and complete story. The first-place prize has doubled to $2,000 USD.

2nd: writing coach package

Deadline: April 30, 2024

Essay, Fantasy, Fiction, Flash Fiction, Humor, Memoir, Mystery, Non-fiction, Science Fiction, Science Writing, Thriller, Young Adult, Children's, Poetry, Romance, Short Story, Suspense, Travel

Indignor Play House Annual Short Story Competition

Indignor House Publishing

Indignor House Publishing is proud to announce that our annual writing competition (INDIGNOR PLAYHOUSE Short Story Annual Competition) is officially open with expected publication in the fall of 2024. Up to 25 submissions will be accepted for inclusion in the annual anthology.

2nd: $250 | 3rd: $150

Fiction, Flash Fiction, Short Story, Crime, Essay, Fantasy, Horror, Humor, Memoir, Mystery, Non-fiction, Novella, Poetry, Romance, Science Fiction, Thriller, Young Adult

Lazuli Literary Group Writing Contest

Lazuli Literary Group

We are not concerned with genre distinctions. Send us the best you have; we want only for it to be thoughtful, intelligent, and beautiful. We want art that grows in complexity upon each visitation; we enjoy ornate, cerebral, and voluptuous phrases executed with thematic intent.

Publication in "AZURE: A Journal of Literary Thought"

Deadline: March 24, 2024

Essay, Fiction, Poetry, Short Story, Flash Fiction, Non-fiction, Novella, Script Writing

swamp pink Prizes

From January 1st to January 31st, submit short stories and essays of up to 25 pages or a set of 1-3 poems. Winners in each genre will receive $2,000 and publication.

Deadline: January 31, 2024 (Expired)

Red Hen Press Women's Prose Prize

Red Hen Press

Established in 2018, the Women’s Prose Prize is for previously unpublished, original work of prose. Novels, short story collections, memoirs, essay collections, and all other forms of prose writing are eligible for consideration. The awarded manuscript is selected through a biennial competition, held in even-numbered years, that is open to all writers who identify as women.

Publication by Red Hen Press

Deadline: February 28, 2024

Fiction, Non-fiction, Short Story, Essay, Memoir, Novel

African Diaspora Awards 2024

Up to $1000 in cash prizes for the African Diaspora Award 2024. African-themed prose and poetry wanted. Top finalists are published in Kinsman Quarterly’s magazine and the anthology, “Black Butterfly: Voices of the African Diaspora.”

Publication in anthology, "Black Butterfly: Voices of the African Diaspora" and print and digital magazine

Deadline: June 30, 2024

Essay, Fiction, Flash Fiction, Non-fiction, Poetry, Short Story

The Letter Review Prize for Unpublished Books

The Letter Review

The Letter Review Prize for Unpublished Books (Fiction, Poetry, Nonfiction) is open to writers from anywhere in the world. Three Winners are awarded, and 20 entries are Shortlisted.

3 x $333 USD

Crime, Essay, Fantasy, Fiction, Flash Fiction, Horror, Humor, Memoir, Mystery, Non-fiction, Novel, Novella, Poetry, Romance, Science Fiction, Science Writing, Short Story, Thriller, Young Adult

The Letter Review Prize for Nonfiction

The Letter Review Prize for Nonfiction (0-5000 words) is open to writers from anywhere in the world and has no theme or genre restrictions. Winners are published and every entry is considered for publication. 20 entries are Shortlisted.

Publication by The Letter Review

Essay, Memoir, Non-fiction

Work-In-Progress (WIP) Contest

Unleash Press

We aim to assist writers in the completion of an important literary project and vision. The Unleash WIP Award offers writers support in the amount of $500 to supplement costs to aid in the completion of a book-length work of fiction, nonfiction, or poetry. Writers will also receive editorial feedback, coaching meetings, and an excerpt/interview feature in Unleash Lit.

Coaching, interview, and editorial support

Deadline: July 15, 2024

Crime, Essay, Fantasy, Fiction, Horror, Humor, Memoir, Mystery, Non-fiction, Novel, Novella, Poetry, Science Fiction, Science Writing, Young Adult

Aurora Polaris Creative Nonfiction Award

Trio House Press

We seek un-agented full-length creative nonfiction manuscripts including memoir, essay collections, etc. 50,000 - 80,000 words.

Deadline: May 15, 2024

National Essay Contest

U.S. Institute of Peace

This year, AFSA celebrates the 100th anniversary of the United States Foreign Service. Over the last century, our diplomats and development professionals have been involved in groundbreaking events in history – decisions on war and peace, supporting human rights and freedom, creating joint prosperity, reacting to natural disasters and pandemics and much more. As AFSA looks back on this century-long history, we invite you to join us in also looking ahead to the future. This year students are asked to explore how diplomats can continue to evolve their craft to meet the needs of an ever-changing world that brings fresh challenges and opportunities to the global community and America’s place in it.

Runner-up: $1,250

Stella Kupferberg Memorial Short Story Prize

Gotham Writers Workshop

The Stella Kupferberg Memorial Short Story Prize is a writing competition sponsored by the stage and radio series Selected Shorts. Selected Shorts is recorded for Public Radio and heard nationally on both the radio and its weekly podcast. This years entries will be judged by Carmen Maria Machado (In the Dream House, Her Body and Other Parties).

$1000 + free 10 week course with Gotham Writers

Crime, Essay, Fantasy, Fiction, Flash Fiction, Horror, Humor, Memoir, Mystery, Non-fiction, Romance, Science Fiction, Short Story, Thriller, Young Adult

Journalism Competition 2024

Write the World

What are the most important issues taking place close to home? Perhaps a rare bird sighting near your town? Or a band of young people in your province fighting for access to higher education? This month, immerse yourself in a newsworthy event inside the borders of your own country, and invite us there through your written reporting.

Best entry: $100

Runner up: $50 | Best peer review: $50

Deadline: July 22, 2024

Personal Essay Competition 2024

We want to hear about an experience in your life, rife with characters and description and conflict and scene… but we also want to hear how you make sense of this experience, how it sits with you, and why it has surfaced as writing. Open a window into your life and invite your readers to enter.

Deadline: June 24, 2024

Essay, Memoir

Environmental Writing 2024

The writer and activist Bill McKibben describes Environmental Writing as "the collision between people and the rest of the world." This month, peer closely at that intersection: How do humans interact with their environment? Given your inheritance of this earth, the world needs your voices now more than ever.

Deadline: April 22, 2024

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educational competition essay

Essay  COMPETITION

2024 global essay prize.

The John Locke Institute encourages young people to cultivate the characteristics that turn good students into great writers: independent thought, depth of knowledge, clear reasoning, critical analysis and persuasive style. Our Essay Competition invites students to explore a wide range of challenging and interesting questions beyond the confines of the school curriculum.

Entering an essay in our competition can build knowledge, and refine skills of argumentation. It also gives students the chance to have their work assessed by experts. All of our essay prizes are judged by a panel of senior academics drawn from leading universities including Oxford and Princeton, under the leadership of the Chairman of Examiners, former Cambridge philosopher, Dr Jamie Whyte.

The judges will choose their favourite essay from each of seven subject categories - Philosophy, Politics, Economics, History, Psychology, Theology and Law - and then select the winner of the Grand Prize for the best entry in any subject. There is also a separate prize awarded for the best essay in the junior category, for under 15s.

Q1. Do we have any good reasons to trust our moral intuition?

Q2. Do girls have a right to compete in sporting contests that exclude boys?

Q3. Should I be held responsible for what I believe?

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Q1. Is there such a thing as too much democracy?

Q2. Is peace in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip possible?

Q3. When is compliance complicity?

Q1. What is the optimal global population?  

Q2. Accurate news reporting is a public good. Does it follow that news agencies should be funded from taxation?

Q3. Do successful business people benefit others when making their money, when spending it, both, or neither?

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Q1. Why was sustained economic growth so rare before the later 18th century and why did this change?

Q2. Has music ever significantly changed the course of history?

Q3. Why do civilisations collapse? Is our civilisation in danger?

Q1. When, if ever, should a company be permitted to refuse to do business with a person because of that person’s public statements?

Q2. In the last five years British police have arrested several thousand people for things they posted on social media. Is the UK becoming a police state?

Q3. Your parents say that 11pm is your bedtime. But they don’t punish you if you don’t go to bed by 11pm. Is 11pm really your bedtime?

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Q1. According to a study by four British universities, for each 16-point increase in IQ, the likelihood of getting married increases by 35% for a man but decreases by 40% for a woman. Why? 

Q2. There is an unprecedented epidemic of depression and anxiety among young people. Can we fix this? How?

Q3. What is the difference between a psychiatric illness and a character flaw?

Q1. “I am not religious, but I am spiritual.” What could the speaker mean by “spiritual”?

Q2. Is it reasonable to thank God for protection from some natural harm if He is responsible for causing the harm?

Q3. Does God reward those who believe in him? If so, why?

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JUNIOR prize

Q1. Does winning a free and fair election automatically confer a mandate for governing?

Q2. Has the anti-racism movement reduced racism?

Q3. Is there life after death?

Q4. How did it happen that governments came to own and run most high schools, while leaving food production to private enterprise? 

Q5. When will advancing technology make most of us unemployable? What should we do about this?

Q6. Should we trust fourteen-year-olds to make decisions about their own bodies? 

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS & FURTHER DETAILS

Please read the following carefully.

Entry to the John Locke Institute Essay Competition 2024 is open to students from any country.

Registration  

Only candidates who registered before the registration deadline of Friday, 31 May 2024 may enter this year's competition.

All entries must be submitted by 11.59 pm BST on  the submission deadline: Sunday, 30 June 2024 .  Candidates must be eighteen years old, or younger, on that date. (Candidates for the Junior Prize must be fourteen years old, or younger, on that date.)

Entry is free.

Each essay must address only one of the questions in your chosen subject category, and must not exceed 2000 words (not counting diagrams, tables of data, endnotes, bibliography or authorship declaration). 

The filename of your pdf must be in this format: FirstName-LastName-Category-QuestionNumber.pdf; so, for instance, Alexander Popham would submit his answer to question 2 in the Psychology category with the following file name:

Alexander-Popham-Psychology-2.pdf

Essays with filenames which are not in this format will be rejected.

The candidate's name should NOT appear within the document itself. 

Candidates should NOT add footnotes. They may, however, add endnotes and/or a Bibliography that is clearly titled as such.

Each candidate will be required to provide the email address of an academic referee who is familiar with the candidate's written academic work. This should be a school teacher, if possible, or another responsible adult who is not a relation of the candidate. The John Locke Institute will email referees to verify that the essays submitted are indeed the original work of the candidates.

Submissions may be made as soon as registration opens in April. We recommend that you submit your essay well in advance of th e deadline to avoid any last-minute complications.

Acceptance of your essay depends on your granting us permission to use your data for the purposes of receiving and processing your entry as well as communicating with you about the Awards Ceremony Dinner, the academic conference for essay competition finalists, and other events and programmes of the John Locke Institute and its associated entities.  

Late entries

If for any reason you miss the 30 June deadline you will have an opportunity to make a late entry, under two conditions:

a) A late entry fee of 20.00 USD must be paid by credit card within twenty-four hours of the original deadline; and

b) Your essay must be submitted  before 11.59 pm BST on Wednesday, 10 July 2024.

To pay for late entry, a registrant need only log into his or her account, select the relevant option and provide the requested payment information.

Our grading system is proprietary. Essayists may be asked to discuss their entry with a member of the John Locke Institute’s faculty. We use various means to identify plagiarism, contract cheating, the use of AI and other forms of fraud . Our determinations in all such matters are final.

Essays will be judged on knowledge and understanding of the relevant material, the competent use of evidence, quality of argumentation, originality, structure, writing style and persuasive force. The very best essays are likely to be those which would be capable of changing somebody's mind. Essays which ignore or fail to address the strongest objections and counter-arguments are unlikely to be successful .

Candidates are advised to answer the question as precisely and directly as possible.

The writers of the best essays will receive a commendation and be shortlisted for a prize. Writers of shortlisted essays will be notified by 11.59 pm BST on Wednesday, 31 July. They will also be invited to London for an invitation-only academic conference and awards dinner in September, where the prize-winners will be announced. Unlike the competition itself, the academic conference and awards dinner are not free. Please be aware that n obody is required to attend either the academic conference or the prize ceremony. You can win a prize without travelling to London.

All short-listed candidates, including prize-winners, will be able to download eCertificates that acknowledge their achievement. If you win First, Second or Third Prize, and you travel to London for the ceremony, you will receive a signed certificate. 

There is a prize for the best essay in each category. The prize for each winner of a subject category, and the winner of the Junior category, is a scholarship worth US$2000 towards the cost of attending any John Locke Institute programme, and the essays will be published on the Institute's website. Prize-giving ceremonies will take place in London, at which winners and runners-up will be able to meet some of the judges and other faculty members of the John Locke Institute. Family, friends, and teachers are also welcome.

The candidate who submits the best essay overall will be awarded an honorary John Locke Institute Junior Fellowship, which comes with a US$10,000 scholarship to attend one or more of our summer schools and/or visiting scholars programmes. 

The judges' decisions are final, and no correspondence will be entered into.

R egistration opens: 1 April, 2024.

Registration deadline: 31 May, 2024. (Registration is required by this date for subsequent submission.)

Submission deadline: 30 June, 2024.

Late entry deadline: 10 July, 2024. (Late entries are subject to a 20.00 USD charge, payable by 1 July.)

Notification of short-listed essayists: 31 July, 2024.

Academic conference: 20 - 22 September, 2024.

Awards dinner: 21 September, 2024.

Any queries regarding the essay competition should be sent to [email protected] . Please be aware that, due to the large volume of correspondence we receive, we cannot guarantee to answer every query. In particular, regrettably, we are unable to respond to questions whose answers can be found on our website.

If you would like to receive helpful tips  from our examiners about what makes for a winning essay or reminders of upcoming key dates for the 2024  essay competition, please provide your email here to be added to our contact list. .

Thanks for subscribing!

oxf-essay-competition-16SEP23-723-CR2_edited_edited.jpg

The John Locke Institute's Global Essay Prize is acknowledged as the world's most prestigious essay competition. 

We welcome tens of thousands of submissions from ambitious students in more than 150 countries, and our examiners - including distinguished philosophers, political scientists, economists, historians, psychologists, theologians, and legal scholars - read and carefully assess every entry. 

I encourage you to register for this competition, not only for the hope of winning a prize or commendation, and not only for the chance to join the very best contestants at our academic conference and gala ceremony in London, but equally for the opportunity to engage in the serious scholarly enterprise of researching, reflecting on, writing about, and editing an answer to one of the important and provocative questions in this year's Global Essay Prize. 

We believe that the skills you will acquire in the process will make you a better thinker and a more effective advocate for the ideas that matter most to you.

I hope to see you in September!

Best wishes,

Jamie Whyte, Ph.D. (C ANTAB ) 

Chairman of Examiners

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Civics Education Essay Contest

NCSC's 2022 Civics Education Essay Contest

educational competition essay

NCSC's Civics Education Essay Contest gives 3rd-12th grade students the opportunity to understand and explain the importance and the role of the United States government. Winners receive a total of $3,000 in scholarship money.

The contest question is based on the American Bar Association's annual Law Day theme, which in 2022 is "Toward a More Perfect Union: The Constitution in Times of Change."

2022's Essay Contest question:

Which amendment to the u.s. constitution has made the biggest difference in people’s lives explain how and why..

Submit your entry using the form below. This is the preferred method of entry. However, hand-written essays may be submitted by mail to NCSC, c/o Deirdre Roesch, 300 Newport Avenue, Williamsburg, Va., 23185. If submitting my mail, please include the following on separate piece of paper: full name, school name, city, state, phone number, email (if applicable), teacher name and teacher email (if applicable).

  • See contest rules and regulations .
  • Download flyer to share with students.

A total of $3,000 in scholarship money will be awarded to the winners.

9th-12th grade:

  • One (1) First Place: $1,000
  • One (1) Second Place: $500
  • One (1) Third Place: $250

6th-8th grade:

  • One (1) First Place: $400
  • One (1) Second Place: $200
  • One (1) Third Place: $100

3rd-5th grade:

  • One (1) First Place: $300
  • One (1) Second Place: $150

Email Contest Manager  Deirdre Roesch with questions about the essay contest.

2024 Essay Contest

NCSC's Civics Education Essay Contest gives 3rd-12th grade students the opportunity to understand and explain the importance and the role of the United States government.  Each student must have an email address and submit their essay using the link below. The contest ends at midnight on March 22. Good luck!

Submit your essay

Elementary School - Justice Sandra Day O'Connor believed that people should take part in their communities and government. What does it mean to be involved in your community? Can you think of ways you can help make your school or neighborhood a better place? (100 words)

Middle and High School - Justice Sandra Day O'Connor stressed the importance of civic engagement. Discuss the role she believed citizens should play in shaping their communities and government. Why did she think that civic participation is so important to democracy? (250 words)

  • Informational Video
  • Contest Rules
  • Contest Flyer
  • Partner Packet and Social Media information

Email Molly Justice if you have any questions.

Contest history

Elementary/Middle school: The First Amendment protects freedom of speech. What happens when people are free to say anything they want in person or online? For example, yelling "fire" in a crowded room or posting hateful words on social media. What kind of free speech situations require a judge or police officer to get involved to keep the peace? High school: In 2021, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that a high school cheerleader could not be punished in school for using curse words on social media when commenting about not making the cheer team while she was off school grounds. Do you think students should be held to the same standard when exercising their First Amendment right to freedom of speech whether they’re on or off school property? Decide if there are circumstances where students should be punished by a court of law for what they say or write to maintain civility.

Read the Press Release Read the winning essays

Question: Which Amendment to the U.S. Constitution has made the biggest difference in people’s lives? Explain how and why.

Read the press release. Read the winning entries Watch the winner's video

Question: What does the rule of law mean to you?

Read the winning entries.

Elementary/Middle school: Why is it so important that all citizens have the right to vote? High school: Is voting a right, privilege or responsibility? Why?

Read the press release. Read the winning entries.

educational competition essay

Immerse Education Essay Competition 2021: What makes a good Doctor?

Four highly motivated Grade 10 students spent a portion of their Christmas holiday writing submissions for the Immerse Education Essay Competition in the hope of winning a 100% scholarship to attend a summer course at Cambridge University in the UK.  The competition is a challenging one: entrants must pick one question from a list of eighteen controversial topics and have only 500 words to defend their answer.  Essays must be fully referenced with footnotes and bibliography.  While we all have our fingers crossed for their success, we are quite simply hugely proud of them for taking the initiative to enter this competition – well done!

Below are two entrants’ essays on this topic ordered alphabetically by name of author:

What makes a good doctor.

Being a medical professional is considered one of the noble and ancient vocations in society. However, considering the plurality of people who become doctors, there must be a plethora of ways to go about being a doctor. This raises the question – what makes a good doctor?

It appears to be universally agreed upon and that medical professionals must put the patients well-being before all else in a quest to minimise suffering. The Hippocratic oath is, despite its age, considered an ethical benchmark even today. It seems so ingrained in all our understanding that it is barely questioned by patients and doctors alike. So when people, be it doctors or patients, talk about ‘good doctors’, what do they actually expect to see from them? More often than not, one will hear the words ‘competence’ and ‘empathy’ being muttered. Although this may seem a bit simplistic, come to think of it, those concepts may well be more intertwined than meets the eye. A competent doctor arrives at a correct and timely diagnosis, initiates an adequate and effective treatment. Key to what patients and their relatives consider great consultations is that their respective concerns, ideas and expectations are addressed, respected and incorporated into the decision making. Empathy forms the missing link. It can allow for a more profound rapport to be established between doctors and patients, helping to obtain a more detailed medical history and aid diagnostics. Obedience to a certain treatment can be improved by tailoring it to a patient’s needs, which, in turn, will improve outcomes. Maintaining a patient centered approach will help decide upon an adequate treatment in the first place. It is safe to say that throughout all stages of the patient’s journey, the idea of empathy has the potential to make the difference between a doctor and a good doctor. Having said all this, it seems by no means easy to display empathy at all times. Increasing specialisation and ever more detailed knowledge and understanding of subspecialities causes ever steeper knowledge gradients to make communication between doctors and patients difficult. This in turn prevents medical professionals from being able to fully dedicate themselves to patients. The increasing availability of in part questionable information and data can both empower patients or destroy the doctor-patient relationship. Similarly, the uncontested status of doctors as ‘demigods in a white coat’ appears to slowly decrease, rendering them to be seen as service providers rather than allies at times. These are changes that affect multiple aspects of society. Therefore, I would conclude that a doctor, as a person and profession, is a reflection of society as a whole. Hence, apart from detailed knowledge and profound understanding of their scientific field, traits that make a good doctor are the same that make a good person and empathy is found at the very core of it. A good doctor is someone who goes above and beyond the call of duty to put the well-being of his or her peers above their own. Someone who, regardless of their own cultural background, political ideology and ethnic heritage, goes out of their way to understand their patients. Finally, someone who, when needed, even forgoes the very science they dedicate their lives to, in order to make a patient feel well. After all, doctors treat patients, not conditions.

Bibliography:

  • Dr. med. B. Hibbeler, “Was ist ein ‘guter’ Arzt”, Ärzteblatt 51-52 (2011) 28th December 2020
  • Saint George University. Unknown Author, “What makes a good doctor?”, 04.02.2018 [ https://www.sgu.edu/blog/medical/what-makes-a-good-doctor/ last accessed: 3rd January 2021]
  • Harvard Blogs. Unknown Author, “What makes a good doctor? Can we measure it?”, 20.03.2014 [ https://blogs.sph.harvard.edu/ashish-jha/2014/03/20/what-makes-a-good-doctor-and-can-we-mea sure-it/ last accessed: 3rd january 2021]
  • The Lancet. Unknown Author, “What makes a good doctor?”, 28.08.2010 [ https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(10)61317-7/fulltext#articleInfo rmation last accessed: 29th December 2020]
  • Physicians Practice. M. Byington, “What are patients looking for in a doctor?”, 10.05.2017 [ https://www.physicianspractice.com/view/what-are-patients-looking-physician last accessed: 2nd January 2021]

A doctor is defined as a person who has been trained in medical science, whose job is to treat people who are ill or injured. According to this definition, what makes you a doctor is clear: the licences and certificates. However, the question of what makes a good doctor is much broader, and for this reason this essay will focus on the comparison between empathy, objectivity and technical competence in relation to the patients recovery and well-being. Firstly, objectivity helps doctors, to a certain extent, to be professionally distant from their patients and apply skills and knowledge rather than emotions to make judgements about treatment for an effective recovery. For example, a heart surgeon uses high amounts of skill during a surgery. When getting emotionally engaged with a patient, the physician can make a biased decision that might not be helpful towards recovery. Emotional detachment is helpful for the doctor too, as the involvement can be difficult to handle mentally. Nevertheless, professionals have stated that complete objectivity is not even possible to achieve and that physicians will always make decisions slightly based upon emotions, experiences and their view of right and wrong. However, people have argued that empathy should be desired rather than objectivity anyways. This consists of listening to a patient but also communicating in a way that can be understood. Medicine should be about treating a person rather than simply curing an illness, and should be taken with a more holistic approach, as our emotional side is what makes us differ from a computer. Whilst a machine might have the technical competence to recognize symptoms and cure the illness, we as humans should ensure that we cure the patient. Many patients want an understanding physician, as this gives them a sense of security. Studies have shown that when this is achieved, the recovery process has a higher chance of being effective. This is partially because up to 30% of all illnesses are somatization, where the mind is involved in the physical condition and only when we relieve the mind we can treat the illness. Moreover, when we look at the patients as people we can prevent further illnesses in the long term by treating more than just the symptoms. A doctor can be differentiated from a good doctor by the balanced coexistence of objectivity and empathy. Whilst the objective side of a person is needed in making effective decisions, the empathic side is what distinguishes between treating a condition and curing a person. However, this must be carefully balanced, for too much objectivity leads to being very distant and too much empathy leads to faulty decision making, both ultimately being harmful to a patient. How this is balanced, however, ranges based on which field you are in, as a cardiologist performs a different job than a family doctor. With this in mind, we should evaluate the contents of studying medicine and consider teaching the students how to reach their own balance, by letting them deal with patients at an early stage, as there is no blueprint to becoming a good doctor. Each individual must find a balance of their own, to make a positive impact on the field and to become the best doctor they can possibly be.

Maren S. Bibliography: “Doctor_1 Noun – Definition, Pictures, Pronunciation And Usage Notes | Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary At Oxfordlearnersdictionaries.Com”, Oxfordlearnersdictionaries.Com , 2021 https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/doctor_1 [accessed 21 December 2020] Hirsch, Elliot, “The Role Of Empathy In Medicine: A Medical Student’s Perspective”, Journal Of Ethics | American Medical Association , 2021 [accessed 20 December 2020] Ross, Donald, “The Objectivity Illusion In Medical Practice”, Association For Psychological Science – APS , 2021 https://www.psychologicalscience.org/observer/the-objectivity-illusion-in-medical-practice (accessed 22 December 2020)

“What Makes A Good Doctor, And Can We Measure It?”, An Ounce Of Evidence | Health Policy , 2021 <https://blogs.sph.harvard.edu/ashish-jha/2014/03/20/what-makes-a-good-doctor-and-can-we-measure-it/ (accessed 20 December 2020)

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Avernus Education International Essay Competition 2023/24

  • Deadline February 19, 2024
  • Region Online

educational competition essay

Call for entries for the Avernus Education International Essay Competition 2024!

Avernus Education is excited to give young people a chance to demonstrate their aptitude in the fields of politics, history, psychology, engineering, law, and medicine. These diverse topic areas highlight the value of interdisciplinary education, which is essential for laying the groundwork for future leaders in our globalized society.

Avernus Education Oxford University Summer Programme offers scholarships to the winners of the International Essay Competition! Partial grants or online course credits are awarded to all shortlisted entries. For elite UK universities (such as Oxbridge and the G5), a victory or participation can make a significant impression on your academic and university application profile.

Senior Category (Ages 17-19) –

“How has the COVID-19 pandemic reshaped the global approach to public health, and what lessons should be carried into the future?”

“Analyse the role of artificial intelligence in diagnostic medicine and its potential effects on healthcare professions.”

Junior Category (Ages 14-16) –

“Discuss the ethical implications of genetic engineering and its impact on the future of medicine.”

“How do lifestyle choices impact long-term health, and what strategies can be implemented to promote healthier living from a young age?”

  • Engineering:

“How will sustainable engineering need to adapt in response to the ever-changing face of climate change?”

“As society moves towards renewable energy, evaluate the engineering challenges and opportunities presented by the integration of large-scale energy storage systems with existing power grids.”

“What role should young engineers play in advocating for and designing sustainable and environmentally friendly practices?”

“As technology advances, how do we ensure safety and ethical considerations in the development of AI?”

  • Psychology:

“Analyse the psychological consequences of long-term remote learning on students.”

“Investigate the role of psychological factors in addiction and the implications for treatment.”

“Analyse the effects of sleep deprivation on learning and memory among school students.”

“Explore the concept of resilience in adolescents: What factors contribute to overcoming adversity?”

“Investigate the role of cryptocurrencies in the modern economy and their potential to disrupt traditional banking.”

“Evaluate the economic consequences of income inequality and potential policies to address it.”

“Discuss the role of economic incentives in promoting recycling and sustainable consumption among households.”

“Explore how advancements in technology are changing the landscape of traditional jobs for the next generation.”

  • History & Politics:

“How do museums impact the way we look at the past?”

“To succeed as a nation, you need a functional government” – What do you think of this statement?

“How does the study of history impact our understanding of current global crises?”

“What role do social media and ‘instant history ‘ play in shaping young people’s perception of the past and present?”

“In an increasingly digital world, how should international law evolve to address the challenges of digital sovereignty?”

“As space becomes the next frontier, how should legal frameworks develop to govern the use and exploration of outer space?”

“What is the role of youth in shaping the future of law in an era of rapid technological advancement?”

“How should laws evolve to protect the environment for future generations in the face of immediate economic interests?”

  • Winners receive an exclusive Avernus Education Scholarship worth over £5000 – granting them free entrance to our exclusive summer camp at Oxford University!
  • Runners Up receives 5 hours worth of Credits for Avernus courses, conferences, and tutoring services.
  • All shortlisted participants will receive a signed Certificate of Completion and a written reference upon request.
  • All shortlisted participants will become part of the Avernus Alumni network, with future invites to conferences and events.

Eligibilities

  • The competition is open to students from the following age groups: Junior Category (Ages 14-16) & Senior Category (Ages 17-19).

Application Process

  • Visit the Apply link by clicking on the “APPLY NOW” button.
  • Complete the form and submit your essay.

Requirements & Instructions:

Each applicant is allowed to submit only ONE essay.

The word limits for the essays are as follows:

Senior applicants: The essay should be between 1300 and 1800 words.

Junior applicants: The essay should be between 1000 and 1200 words.

The essay must be submitted in PDF format.

The essay should be typed in Times New Roman font, with a 12-point size, and double-spaced.

It is important to ensure that the essay is original and free from plagiarism. This includes not using any ‘Chatbots’ to generate or assist in writing the essay.

If any citations are used in the essay, they should be properly referenced according to a recognized citation style (e.g., APA, MLA, Chicago).

The essay must be written in English.

Application Deadline: February 19, 2024

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Opportunity Desk

Immerse Education Essay Competition 2024

educational competition essay

Deadline: January 4, 2024

Applications are open for the Immerse Education Essay Competition 2024 . The Immerse Education Essay Competition provides the opportunity for students aged 13-18 to submit essay responses to a question of their choice relating to a subject of interest. There are over twenty questions to choose from which can be found in the full Essay Competition Guide. 10 winners will receive a 100% scholarship to study at a world-leading university of their choosing. Outstanding runners-up also receive partial scholarships.

Benefits of the competition include:

  • Funded scholarship to study abroad:  The essay competition offers students like you the chance to win a full or partial scholarship to one of their Online Programmes or residential programmes in locations such as Oxford, Cambridge, Sydney, London and more.
  • Ongoing support from Immerse while you write:  Full support from the team as you write your essay, with free guides and top tips to help you along the way. Sign up to receive the full Essay competition Guide and free tips and tricks as you write.
  • Demonstrate what you know:  The competition is a chance for you to demonstrate your content knowledge by answering advanced university-style questions.
  • Build your skills and knowledge:  The opportunity to apply and advance your essay writing skills. You will likely learn something new in the process!
  • Develop your self-discipline:  A chance to strengthen your self-discipline as you commit to a challenging project and complete it from start to finish.
  • 1st place: 10 winners will receive a 100% scholarship.
  • Runners Up will be awarded partial scholarships of up to 50% to study their chosen subject with Immerse. The number of runners-up will be determined by the number of entries received, and the quality of the work submitted. Usually, around 7% of entrants receive scholarship funding to attend an Immerse programme.

Eligibility

  • The Immerse Education Essay Competition is open to students worldwide of all nationalities.
  • You must be aged between 13-18 during your chosen programme.
  • Be interested in all subjects, from Architecture to Medicine, Creative Writing to Film Studies. 

Application

The deadline for all essay entries for this round of the competition is January 4, 2024.

Click here to apply

For more information, visit Immerse Education Essay Competition .

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Jude Ogar is an educator and youth development practitioner with years of experience working in the education and youth development space. He is passionate about the development of youth in Africa.

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George S. & Stella M. Knight Essay Contest - 8 Tips to Ace It

As a high school student, you’re probably already planning your college applications, and thinking about how yours can stand out. Extracurricular competitions can add a competitive edge to your applications and your profile. College applications that include a students’ participation and potential achievements in a prestigious contest, show admissions officers the students’ intellectual curiosity, analytical abilities, and commitment to tackling real-world problems. Admissions officers look for students who are not just academically accomplished but also curious and capable of independent, critical thinking. 

Participating in essay contests allows students to enhance their academic portfolios, refine their writing skills, and learn more about politics and society.  One such prestigious competition is the George S. & Stella M. Knight Essay Contest,   hosted by the National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution (SAR) .

What is the George S. & Stella M. Knight Essay Contest?

This prestigious contest, hosted by the National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution (SAR), invites high school students (in grades 9-12) who are interested in the American Revolution. Open to U.S. citizens and legal resident students across various educational backgrounds, including home schools, public, parochial, or private high schools, this contest is an opportunity for students keen  to explore the historical nuances of the nation's foundation.

To participate, students must craft an original 800-1,200-word essay, delving into an event, person, philosophy, or ideal associated with the American Revolution, Declaration of Independence, or the framing of the United States Constitution . Entries are judged based on historical accuracy, clarity, organization, grammar and spelling, and documentation.

How is it structured?

The contest is conducted in three phases: the local chapter, state-level society, and national phases. To enter, students must go through an SAR chapter near their residence. In some cases, the contest may be entered at the state level (if the local society does not have chapters or the chapters are not participating). Only one entry per student is permitted per contest year.

Submission rules

Contest entries must be submitted as PDF files attached to emails. The essay encompasses four parts: a title page, essay pages, a bibliography or works cited, and the applicant's biography. Strict adherence to formatting rules is crucial for acceptance and includes specific guidelines for the title page, essay pages, bibliography, and biography. For access to the application, see the following link !

Tip: Make sure you go through the rules  thoroughly before entering the contest. The organizers have also provided a sample essay  for students to go through.

Awards at the local and state-level may vary. The winner of the contest at the national level receives a $6,000 cash award, a medal, and a recognition certificate . They will also b eligible for a $1500 travel stipend for expenses when they attend Congress. The first runner-up, or second place, receives a $3000 cash award and a recognition certificate. The second runner-up, or third place, receives a $2,000 cash award and a recognition certificate. Students who place fourth and fifth receive a $500 award and a recognition certificate.

The winning essay at the national level may be published in the SAR Magazine. Take a look at the former winners and their respective SAR locations here . 

Here’s 8 tips to help you ace the contest:

1. Leverage Official Resources: Make sure you thoroughly explore the resources provided by the Sons of the American Revolution (SAR). The official website   is a treasure trove of information, including historical documents, reference materials, and guidelines to kickstart your research process.

2. Study Past Entries:  Go through the archives of past winning entries available on the official website. Analyze the content, writing style, and unique approaches that caught judges' attention. Use these insights to tailor your approach and stand out. 

3. Adhere to Formatting Guidelines: Strictly adhere to the contest's specific formatting rules outlined on the official website. This includes meticulous attention to detail for the title page, essay pages, bibliography, and biography. Following these guidelines ensures that your submission is not disqualified due to formatting issues.

4. Conduct Thorough Research: Go beyond the basics and engage in thorough research using reliable and well-documented sources. Beyond textbooks, explore primary sources, historical archives, and scholarly articles to add depth and authenticity to your essay. The SAR's website may provide additional resource links for your research.

5. Prioritize Clarity and Organization: Craft your essay with a focus on clarity and logical organization. Ensure a smooth flow of ideas, with each paragraph seamlessly leading to the next. Use headings and subheadings to guide the reader and maintain a coherent structure.

6. Pay Attention to Grammar and Spelling: Pay meticulous attention to the finer details of your writing. Use tools like grammar checkers and proofread your work multiple times to eliminate grammatical or spelling errors. A flawless presentation enhances the overall professionalism of your submission.

7. Diversify Your References: Showcase a comprehensive understanding of the topic by incorporating diverse references. Utilize a mix of published works, primary sources, and reputable online resources. Ensure proper citation according to the specified citation system outlined in the contest rules.

8. Create an Impressive Biography: Your biography is not a mere formality, it can be an opportunity to present yourself holistically. Highlight your academic achievements, awards, school and community activities, and articulate your plans. Craft a compelling narrative reflecting your passion for history and commitment to academic excellence.

Final thoughts 

The George S. & Stella M. Knight essay contest is not just a competition but a journey into the heart of American history. This contest is a valuable opportunity for high school students who aspire to make a mark with their writing.  It is a great opportunity for students looking to enhance their writing ability and gain some recognition as they apply to colleges and universities. Due to its prestigious and selective nature, we recommend students who are interested in boosting their academic profile to participate in this contest. By following these tips and making the most of the official resources, you can produce an essay that not only stands out but contributes meaningfully to the discourse on our nation's founding principles. Good luck!

One other option – the Lumiere Research Scholar Program

If you are interested in pre-college programs focused on history, consider applying to the Lumiere Research Scholar Program , a selective online high school program for students I founded with researchers at Harvard and Oxford. Last year, we had over 4000 students apply for 500 spots in the program! You can find the application form  here.

Also, check out the Lumiere Research Inclusion Foundation , a non-profit research program for talented, low-income students.

Tenzing Dolma is a Masters student specializing in research following the Nechung Oracle and the historical, religious, and cognitive approaches to its presence. She has a bachelors in Neuroscience from Loyola University Chicago and is currently completing her graduate studies at Columbia University. She hopes to help students find their passions through access to programs and organizations the same way she found hers!

Image Source: SAR logo

  • competitions

educational competition essay

The Role of Competition and Culture in our Education Systems

By kate ericksen.

Recently, I watched a video on You Tube 1  showing 5 North Korean kindergarten children playing classical guitar together. They were playing them like pros with (dare I say it) plastic smiles and synchronized turning on their chairs. The performance was very polished and I watched with both a sense of awe and disbelief. I was wondering if the footage was really genuine, as it just did not seem possible that such young children could be playing such complicated classical guitar with such flourish and perfection.

However, what I found even more interesting was to read though the comments that people had written below the video. This video definitely sparked a powerful trigger with many people around the world and some rather heated arguments and discussions ensued. They ranged from awe and admiration, to disgust at how the parents must have pushed them so much, to a criticism of communist state education, which doesn’t allow children to experience childhood. A grown-up child performer wrote, who had been forced to practice for hours a day on the guitar, talking about how he would have bleeding hands, and the sacrifice that this required. Others admired the development of the brain which would have occurred due to this musical training and wished that in their culture, they took education as seriously as in Asia. These viewers’ comments echoed many of the sentiments that have passed through my head in the last few days, as I reflected upon a performance that I took part in judging recently in a school in the Philippines.

My purpose in writing this article is to explore the issues that surround competition in schools, across cultures and to reflect on whether the inclusion of competition at a young age encourages healthy development and promotes our neo-humanistic vision, or whether it goes ultravires to it. I will look at how cultural perceptions influence the way in which schools function and how we can encourage more “buy in” by staff at our schools to truly model the values we say we teach, of which our views on competition are one such value.

1  (http://tinyurl.com/68qxrmr)

Competition and Education

Competition is considered by many as healthy, a fact of life, and is an implicit part of education, in which grades are regularly assigned and students ranked against each other in class reports in many countries. We are all subjected to competition when we enter the workforce –competing against others to win the job, so the earlier we are exposed to it, the reasoning seems to go, the better prepared we will be to meet the challenges it poses. Thus, we should learn how to deal with disappointment – a natural consequence of competition – since there is only ever one winner and many losers.

As a classroom teacher, I have observed how having an element of competition in certain activities definitely does enhance interest and concentration. It seems a natural element in growing up, for example children regularly organize their own informal competitions at home, from simple activities, like who can make their ice-cream last the longest, to who can get the ball into the basket the most times.

Kids love guessing games, and I regularly employ “breathers” during formal lessons, in which we hold silly competitions to re-energise the class and provide a break from the challenges of academics. I wonder though how to tailor programs so that “healthy” competition does not become unhealthy. Where do you draw the line? How do you create competitions that encourage and motivate students, yet do not mean that some students’ self esteem will be damaged? What role would the assessment systems in a true neo-humanist school have on student self esteem and willingness to participate and learn? How, as neo-humanist educators, do we reflect our values in the different cultures in which we run our classes and schools?

Education theorists do not agree on whether competitive desires should be encouraged or constrained. One theory claims that, since competition is part of every culture and since education should transmit culture, it is necessary to incorporate competition into education to help children get used to it in later life. Another theory views competition as opposed to collaboration and, therefore, as an evil element in culture that should be curtailed. At school this often results in an ambiguous attitude towards competition, which confuses students, who will then try to compete successfully without making it appear they compete.

“It may help to distinguish two views of competition. In one view, all other competitors are perceived as the focus of competition; they need to be defeated. In the second view, the focus is oneself or some external entity (such as the clock or a mathematical problem). The latter view is more conducive to teamwork, which has become even more important in modern society.” [my emphasis][i] 

School counselors invariably are against the absurdity of some of the competitiveness that occurs in schools, because they have to deal with the fallout – distraught students whose hopes have been dashed, those who can’t face their peers or teachers after being judged negatively, and those who become suicidal due to extreme pressures of competition – a well-known side effect of the stringent Japanese education system.

Many of the comments related to the Korean children’s performance referred to earlier, reflected the cultural bias of those from different education systems and their concept of a “proper” childhood. As our AMSAI schools are often run by international personnel, we have the benefit of looking at things from a different perspective to the local culture, but we also need to maintain a balanced view and remember that every culture has both positive and negative aspects, including our own “home” culture. How do we sieve out and use the different positive aspects of both to enhance our curriculums and systems of school management, whilst reducing the negative ones? How do we influence the teachers’ styles of teaching to reflect these values? If our teachers don’t understand our values or don’t place importance on them, what do we do?

Education reflects the culture of society in its current evolution

The most memorable education paper I read at the University talked about the development of the concept of childhood as being only a very recent phenomenon. Prior to about 1850, children in the Western world were viewed as tiny adults, who were expected to undertake the same responsibilities and tasks as adults, albeit imperfectly, due to their undeveloped physical structures – thus earning them repeated beatings and scoldings. Child labour was the norm and “education” was the domain of rich children who received private tuition from hired subject tutors and governesses.

This system is still the norm in many “undeveloped” countries of the world today, where older girls do not attend school, or attend intermittently, because their main responsibility is to assist the mother in the raising of younger siblings, cooking, cleaning, feeding and caring for sick infants etc. Boys may be expected to help out in the farm instead of going to school, or be withdrawn from school at key times in the agricultural calendar to help the father, or as an apprentice in his chosen profession. A child (and subsequently a teacher) raised in this type of world is going to have quite a different set of values and expectations than those of a child raised in a society which views childhood as a prolonged period of dependency and the opportunity to “have fun” without worrying about livelihood, where children are raised on a diet of TV, computer games and out of school hobbies are encouraged. (The teachers whom I worked with in Ghana did not understand the word “hobbies” and what it implied).

Only in the last two hundred years, since the Industrial Revolution, has formal education become the domain of the common person. With the rise of factories, there arose a system of “factory” education in which students are mass produced, much like material commodities. Our schooling systems today reflect this global emphasis on capitalism, competition and materialism – the ostensible aim is to produce happy and balanced children who will slot into the workforce with a minimum of effort from employers. Needs should meet the demand. When there is a gap between the two, then the education system must change to accommodate this. Verhoef, author of an interesting article on the different types of competitions included in educational practise explains further:

“As the demands on a society change, its culture changes, and consequently also its educational practices must change. Though difficult to understand in detail, this process of change appears to be a never-ending, self-propelling cycle. In order for a system with feedback to be stable, the response to change must be delayed. Education, therefore, always seems too late in its adjustment. Currently, the knowledge and skills to survive in what has become known as the information society are being incorporated.”[iii]

School driven missions and objectives

The public school in New Zealand, where I have worked for the last few years, last year undertook professional training in a program called PB4L – Positive Behaviour for Learning. This program has been used successfully in difficult and low socio-economic schools in Australia, US and around the world. Part of this program meant the school had to go through considerable consultation processes with parents, teachers and children to identify those core values felt to be important by the community. Once identified, then it is the role of teachers to transmit them and make students very conscious of them. Parents are expected to follow up on this back home too.

We came up with the “3 B’s” – Be respectful, Be responsible, Be safe. It was important that the values were simple and easy to remember. This then meant that we looked at ways in which we could promote this message. Certificates are now issued on a weekly basis at school assemblies to those students who display these core values. Students who display these values at lunchtime have their names put in a raffle which is drawn at each weekly assembly, of which prizes include educational books. Lessons in social graces and being a helpful citizen were designed during staff training sessions, where we broke into different groups and looked at different behaviours we wished to see our students modeling. These behaviours (such as sitting whilst eating or standing in a line before moving quietly through the school) were then explicitly taught, rather than students being expected to learn them through osmosis.

How does this relate to competition in schools? For me, it shows that it is important to take the time to sit down with teachers and stakeholders at the school to really identify those values which we deem to be important, and to then use these as a guide against which to judge the various programs we implement across the school. Having all people contributing in the process means that those initiatives will then be taken on board by more people, rather than it just being a decree that comes down from management. So – the values in a Neo-Humanist school are intricately linked with Yama and Niyama. What about actually looking at our school programs in the light of two or three of these principles and really reflecting on and thinking deeply about what we are doing. I mean a deep reflection, not a superficial one. If you were to choose three values, what would they be? Would “be respectful” then influence your policies on competition? How?

Despite groaning about it at times, it has meant that head teachers have been provided with a clear insight into how to guide the teams of teachers beneath them in the implementation of these values. Many insightful discussions amongst teachers have been initiated and plans of action formed, which I would say deeply reflected neo-humanist values and a respect and empathy for the students in their care. It has altered the way that we run sports competitions at our school and infiltrates every aspect of the school programs and systems that are put in place. It affects the way a teacher sets up her classroom, and the way that problems are dealt with between students when they are encountered.

Shrii PR Sarkar on Competition

What does the founder of Neohumanist Education have to say about the role of competition in education? When I questioned the benevolence of competition, I was told by some that Shrii PR Sarkar was very much pro-competition. I came across this quote early on in my research on competition amongst Sarkar’s extensive writing:

“Kaos’ikii [a yogic dance for physical health] is beneficial for both men and women. Competition in tándava [men’s yogic dance] and kaos’ikii is very good and encouraging. I strongly support it. There should be competitions wherever there are Ananda Margiis [practitioners of a specific system of yoga and meditation]. There should be competitions even where there are no Ananda Margis. There is no harm in it; rather it is beneficial in all respects.” [iv] 

I understand this quote to relate directly to the performance of kaoshikii and tandava competitions, not as a blanket statement about the beneficial nature of competitions across all areas. It is this quote however, which I suspect is being referred to, when I am told that Shrii PR Sarkar approved of competitions. If the last two sentences are taken out of context, then certainly, it would seem that he approved of all types of competition.

I delved deeper to see if I could find other statements, which would either support the assumption that all competitions are beneficial, or whether it is relating to purely tandava and kaoshiki. This is what I came across:

“…to bring about the real well-being of humanity, greater attention has to be paid to the psychic and intellectual expressions of human beings, for that will lead to perfect spiritual composure and all-round fulfilment in human life. Competition in the realm of physical pabula may bring satisfaction in material enjoyment, but it leads human beings far, far away from inner tranquility.”[v] 

So, in this quote Shrii PR Sarkar is saying that competition may bring about material benefits, as economists have proven to be true, and winners of Olympic medals, may vouch for this too – but for those trying to develop “perfect spiritual composure” and “inner tranquility” it will lead them far away. This then, seems to be key to our education system– where greater attention has to be “paid to the psychic and intellection expressions of human being.” This would then imply that we should carefully look at the types of competition we encourage in our schools, and gear them more towards competition to better one’s own performance rather than against another child.

In conclusion, I would encourage directors of our neohumanist schools across the globe to initiate discussions with their staff, in which they were not preaching at them and trying to change them, but rather recognizing them as fellow travelers on the path to realization. Take the time to seek their valuable opinions and expertise in the culture in which they are teaching. Together plan or alter programs to fit in alignment with a set of shared values which is co-created by all stakeholders in the school, and which then become part of the school’s motto and is displayed visibly around the school.

As both an educator and a spiritual aspirant, it is valuable to take time out to reflect on our actions and systems and how they either nurture or conflict with the values we say we espouse. By promoting the type of competition which focuses on improved self-performance, rather than against a competitor, it actually encourages colloboration and co-operative learning, which are surely aspirations for our neo-humanist schools.

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educational competition essay

2021 Essay Competition Winner – Riya R

educational competition essay

Written by:

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2021-essay-competition-winner-riya

Take a look at one of the winning entries to the Immerse Education Essay Competition from the Medicine category. Congratulations to all participants and in particular to those who won 100% scholarships!

by Riya R . Read Riya’s Scholarship Story Here.

How important are soft skills for medical professionals?

The Oxford English Dictionary defines soft skills as ‘personal attributes that enable someone to interact effectively and harmoniously with other people’. Soft skills, often referred to as transferable or professional skills, are intangible, non-technical, and are the personal character traits or qualities to help succeed in any profession. 1 For medical professionals, soft skills such as communication, teamwork, patience and compassion are vital to effectively engage with patients, their families and coworkers.

In 2007, a study of 240 medical errors by trainees, including 167 breakdowns in teamwork, identified poor non-technical skills as the main cause. By contrast, 139 errors were attributed to lack of technical competence. 2

Teamwork is a critical soft skill for medical professionals to safely and compassionately deliver patient care. In surgery, increasing effective teamwork between multi-disciplinary teams is found to decrease patient mortality rates. 3 This shows the significance of soft skills in saving lives.

Effective communication skills can help identify patient needs. Medical professionals communicate with one another and patients in various ways including written, face-to-face, and virtually. Written communication is key to making referrals, updating patient records and prescribing medication. 4

“When I define communication, I think of a new grad who is proactive, direct, open, honest, thoughtful and it’s not just about what they say, it’s how they say it,” says Jennifer O’Leary, Faculty, Genetics Technology at The Michener Institute, Canada. 5 Good communication skills include actively listening to others, processing feedback received, and reflecting on the feedback.

Surgeons are among those most resistant to acknowledging the need to brush up their speaking skills and a cause of concern for the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS), UK. According to Charles Collins, Chair of the Patient Liaison Groups at RCS, “Only around 25 per cent of a surgeon’s job requires technical expertise, even less in many specialties. The rest is about communicating with patients.” 6 Surgeons need communication skills to discuss complicated procedures and help patients make informed choices. 7

Patience is an essential soft skill for medical professionals. Whether guiding a patient and family through a challenging illness, or managing staff members during a period of heavy admissions, having patience can help decompress stress and enable more effective problem-solving. 8

As medical professionals continually adopt new technologies to engage remotely with patients – as seen during the current coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic – there is an increasing reliance on soft skills. In light of COVID-19, the NHS has turned to remote consultations to minimise the risk of infection for staff and patients. 9 Such consultations using live video conferencing highlight a clinician’s body language and facial expressions, enabling a patient to clearly understand the message being conveyed. 10

To summarise, soft skills for medical professionals are more important than ever to deliver safe and effective patient care. An increasing dependency on technology and virtual interactions make it imperative for soft skills to be taught as part of medical and associated healthcare curricula globally.

Bibliography

1 Ashley Rego. “Soft skills: Who says they can’t be taught?” Canadian Journal of Medical Laboratory Science 79:2 (2017): 11

2 Hardeep Singh, Eric J. Thomas, MD, MPH, Laura A. Petersen, MD, MPH, “Medical Errors Involving Trainees: A Study of Closed Malpractice Claims from 5 Insurers” JAMA Internal Medicine 167:19 (2007): 2030-2036

3 Andrew Jenkinson. “Teamwork in Surgery” The Laparoscopic Consultant

https://www.laparoscopicconsultant.co.uk/pdf/teamwork-in-surgery.pdf [Last Accessed: 3rd Jan 2020]

4 Evie Lee. “Effective Communication in Health and Social Care” CPD Online College (2021) https://cpdonline.co.uk/knowledge-base/care/effective-communication/ [Last Accessed: 3rd Jan 2020]

5 Ashley Rego. “Soft skills: Who says they can’t be taught?” Canadian Journal of Medical Laboratory Science 79:2 (2017):11

6 Jane Feinmann . “Brushing up on doctors’ communication skills.” The Lancet. 360:9345 (2002)

7 Wendy Levinson, Pamela Hudak, Andrea C.Tricco. “A systematic review of surgeon–patient communication: Strengths and opportunities for improvement” ScienceDirect 93:1 (2013): 3-17

8 Bushardt, Reamer L. “Patience is still a virtue” JAAPA (Journal of the American Academy of PAs)

29:5 (2016): 13-14

9 British Medical Association ( BMA ) “COVID-19: video consultations and home working” (2021) https://www.bma.org.uk/advice-and-support/covid-19/adapting-to-covid/covid-19-video-consultations

-and-homeworking [Last Accessed: 3rd Jan 2020]

10 P. Vermeir, D. Vandijck, S. Degroote, R. Peleman, R. Verhaeghe, E. Mortier, G. Hallaert, S. Van Daele, W. Buylaert, D. Vogelaers. “Communication in healthcare: a narrative review of the literature and practical recommendations” IJCP (The International Journal of Clinical Practice) (2015) https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/ijcp.12686 [Last Accessed: 3rd Jan 2020]

British Medical Association ( BMA ) “COVID-19: video consultations and home working” (2021) https://www.bma.org.uk/advice-and-support/covid-19/adapting-to-covid/covid-19-video-consultations

Bushardt, Reamer L. “Patience is still a virtue” JAAPA (Journal of the American Academy of PAs)

May 2016 29:5 13-14

https://journals.lww.com/jaapa/FullText/2016/05000/Patience_is_still_a_virtue.1.aspx

Feinmann , J “Brushing up on doctors’ communication skills.” The Lancet. 360:9345 . 16 Nov. 2002 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(02)11592-3

Jenkinson, A. “Teamwork in Surgery” The Laparoscopic Consultant

Lee, E. “Effective Communication in Health and Social Care” CPD Online College (2021) https://cpdonline.co.uk/knowledge-base/care/effective-communication/ [Last Accessed: 3rd Jan 2020]

Levinson, W. Hudak, P. Andrea C.Tricco. “A systematic review of surgeon–patient communication: Strengths and opportunities for improvement” ScienceDirect 93:1 (2013) 3-17 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2013.03.023

P. Vermeir, D. Vandijck, S. Degroote, R. Peleman, R. Verhaeghe, E. Mortier, G. Hallaert, S. Van Daele, W. Buylaert, D. Vogelaers. “Communication in healthcare: a narrative review of the literature and practical recommendations” IJCP (The International Journal of Clinical Practice) 6 July, 2015 https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/ijcp.12686 [Last Accessed: 3rd Jan 2020]

Rego, A. “Soft skills: Who says they can’t be taught?” Canadian Journal of Medical Laboratory Science 79:2 (2017):11

https://www.proquest.com/docview/1917630414?pq-origsite=gscholar&fromopenview=true

Singh, H. Eric J. Thomas, Laura A. Petersen, David M. Studdert Arch Intern Med. JAMA Internal Medicine 167:19 (2007):2030-2036.

Why Apply To The Immerse Education Essay Competition? 

Are you a highly motivated student aged 13-18? Have you ever wanted to experience studying at Cambridge or Oxford? 

The Immerse Education essay competition allows you the chance to submit an essay for the chance to be awarded a scholarship to the award-winning Cambridge summer school . 

How To Apply To The Immerse Education Essay Competition? 

The Immerse Education annual essay competition is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to win a scholarship to a Cambridge or Oxford summer school . 

If you’re aged 13-18 and you’re interested in applying to the Immerse Education essay competition then please visit our essay competition page for more details.

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educational competition essay

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Unionville-Chadds Ford Virtual Academy students…

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Unionville-chadds ford virtual academy students honored for winning essay contest.

Pictured from left to right are Dr. Mark Slider, Shannon Brown, Lucas Yates, Lillianna Yates, Elberta Cintron and Steve Grabicki. (Photo courtesy of CCIU)

Unionville —  Siblings Lucas and Lillianna Yates were celebrated as the Chester County Chapter’s winners of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) American history essay contest at the West Goshen Township Municipality building on Monday, February 12, 2024.

Lucas and Lillianna, who are both students at Unionville-Chadds Ford Virtual Academy (UCFVA), facilitated by Brandywine Virtual Academy (BVA), were selected as the local winners for their essays highlighting John Philip Sousa and his role in writing the marching song, “The Stars and Stripes Forever,” as well as the official marching song of the United States Marine Corps, “Semper Fidelis.” Both Lucas and Lillianna wrote exceptional essays from an accurate and historically supported perspective.

“Lucas’ achievement speaks to his strong work ethic and natural curiosity for history,” said Jennifer Burpoe, Lucas’ UCFVA social studies teacher. “I am very proud of his accomplishment.”

When asked why he entered the DAR essay contest, Lucas’ answer was simple. “I enjoy reading about history,” he said. When asked how UCFVA helped prepare him for this accomplishment, Lucas said it helped him gain more experience with typing skills and working on documents. “My teachers did a great job of helping me one-on-one,” he added.

Lillianna’s UCFVA social studies teacher, Charlie Gracie, also expressed immense pride in Lillianna’s achievement. “Lillianna’s projects and essay responses this year have been consistently insightful,” said Gracie.

“I was excited when I heard there was a chance for me to practice my writing skills and learn about history while doing it,” said Lillianna. When asked what advice she would give to future participants, she said, “Just try it. Even if you don’t win, you’ll learn something new and have a sense of accomplishment about yourself.”

The DAR American history contest is open to students in grades 5-8 who attend public school, non-traditional public school or approved home-schooling programs. The American history essay focuses on the men and women who played a role in the events of the American Revolution and challenges students to explore patriots who interest and inspire them. The patriot could be a famous founder or an everyday man, woman or child who contributed to the American Revolution.

Students who submit an essay are asked to discuss how their patriot contributed to the founding of our nation. Essays are judged on historical accuracy, structure, interest, originality, spelling, grammar, punctuation and the quality and credibility of references.

The national winner will be announced in April and will receive a certificate, medal and cash prize. The winner will also be recognized at the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution annual Continental Congress, and the winning essay may appear in official DAR communications.

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‘Where We Are’: A Photo Essay Contest for Exploring Community

Using an immersive Times series as inspiration, we invite teenagers to document the local communities that interest them. Contest dates: Feb. 14 to March 20.

A group of friends sitting on an orange picnic blanket in a sun-dappled park, surrounded by green grass and trees.

By The Learning Network

The Covid-19 pandemic closed schools and canceled dances. It emptied basketball courts, theaters, recreation centers and restaurants. It sent clubs, scout troops and other groups online.

Now, many people have ventured back out into physical spaces to gather with one another once again. What does in-person “community” look like today? And what are the different ways people are creating it?

In this new contest, inspired by “ Where We Are ” — an immersive visual project from The New York Times that explores the various places around the world where young people come together — we’re inviting teenagers to create their own photo essays to document the local, offline communities that interest them.

Take a look at the full guidelines and related resources below to see if this is right for your students. We have also posted a student forum and a step-by-step lesson plan . Please ask any questions you have in the comments and we’ll answer you there, or write to us at [email protected]. And, consider hanging this PDF one-page announcement on your class bulletin board.

Here’s what you need to know:

The challenge, a few rules, resources for teachers and students, frequently asked questions, submission form.

Using The Times’s Where We Are series as a guide, create a photo essay that documents an interesting local, offline community. Whether your grandmother’s Mah Jong club, the preteens who hang out at a nearby basketball court, or the intergenerational volunteers who walk the dogs for your neighborhood animal shelter, this community can feature people of any age, as long as it gathers in person.

We encourage you to choose a community you are not a part of for reasons we explain below, in the F.A.Q.

Whichever community you choose, however, it’ll be your job to interview and photograph them. Then, you’ll pull everything together in a visual essay, which will tell the group’s story via a short introduction and a series of captioned photographs.

Your photo essay MUST include:

Between six and eight images, uploaded in the order in which you’d like us to view them.

A short caption of no more than 50 words for each image that helps explain what it shows and why it is important to the story.

A short introduction of up to 300 words that offers important background or context that complements and adds to the information in the photos and captions. You might consider the introduction the beginning of your essay, which the photos and captions will then continue. Together they will answer questions like who this community is, how it came to be, and why it matters. (Our How-To guide offers more detail about this.)

At least one quote — embedded in either the introduction or one of the captions — from a member of the community about what makes it meaningful.

In addition to the guidelines above, here are a few more details:

You must be a student ages 13 to 19 in middle school or high school to participate , and all students must have parent or guardian permission to enter. Please see the F.A.Q. section for additional eligibility details.

The photographs and writing you submit should be fundamentally your own — they should not be plagiarized, created by someone else or generated by artificial intelligence.

Your photo essay should be original for this contest. That means it should not already have been published at the time of submission, whether in a school newspaper, for another contest or anywhere else.

Keep in mind that the work you send in should be appropriate for a Times audience — that is, something that could be published in a family newspaper (so, please, no curse words).

You may work alone, in pairs, or in groups of up to four for this challenge , but students should submit only one entry each.

Remember to get permission from those you photograph, and to collect their contact information. Learn more about this in the F.A.Q. below.

You must also submit a short, informal “artist’s statement” as part of your submission, that describes your process. These statements, which will not be used to choose finalists, help us to design and refine our contests. See the F.A.Q. to learn more.

All entries must be submitted by March 20, at 11:59 p.m. Pacific time using the electronic form below.

Use these resources to help you create your photo essay:

A related Student Opinion question to help you brainstorm ideas before you begin taking photos.

A step-by-step guide that uses examples from the Where We Are series to walk students through creating their own.

Free links to the “Where We Are” Collection :

1. The Magic of Your First Car 2. At This Mexican Restaurant, Everyone is Family 3. Where the Band Kids Are 4. In This Nigerian Market, Young Women Find a Place of Their Own 5. At Camp Naru, Nobody Is ‘an Outlier’ 6. For Black Debutantes in Detroit, Cotillion Is More Than a Ball 7. At This Wrestling Academy, Indian Girls Are ‘Set Free’ 8. In Seville, Spain, These Young Rappers Come Together to Turn ‘Tears Into Rhymes’ 9. For a Queer Community in Los Angeles, This Public Park Is a Lifeline 10. In Guatemala, A Collective of Young Artists Finds Family Through Film 11. On a Caribbean Island, Young People Find Freedom in ‘Bike Life’ 12. At This Texas Campus Ministry, ‘Inclusive Love’ Is the Mission 13. For Young Arab Americans in Michigan, the Hookah Lounge Feels like Home

An activity sheet for understanding and analyzing the Where We Are series.

Lessons on interviewing and taking photographs . While these two resources were originally created for our 2022 Profile Contest , each contains scores of tips from educators and Times journalists that can help students learn to interview, and to take and select compelling photographs that tell a story.

Our contest rubric . These are the criteria we will use to judge this contest. Keep them handy to make sure your photo essay meets all of the qualifications before entering.

Below are answers to your questions about writing, judging, the rules and teaching with this contest. Please read these thoroughly and, if you still can’t find what you’re looking for, post your query in the comments or write to us at [email protected].

QUESTIONS ABOUT CREATING YOUR PHOTO ESSAY

What is a photo essay? How does it differ from just a series of photos?

A photo essay tells a story through a series of images. These images work together and build on each other to explore a theme of some kind. The photo essays in the Where We Are series, for instance, focus on the themes of community and coming-of-age, but each through a different lens, as the three images published here illustrate. Together they are beautiful examples of how visual collections can investigate ideas by illuminating both the “big picture” and the tiny, telling details.

How do I choose a good subject for this?

Our Student Opinion forum can help via its many questions that encourage you to brainstorm local, offline communities of all kinds.

Can I be a member of the community I photograph?

You can, but we encourage you not to. Part of the point of this contest is to help you investigate the interesting subcultures in your area, and expand your understanding of “community” by finding out about groups you otherwise may never have known existed.

But we also think it will be easier to do the assignment as an outsider. You will be coming to the community with “fresh eyes” and relative objectivity, and will be able to notice things that insiders may be too close to see.

If you do choose to depict a community you are a part of, we ask that you do not include yourself in the photos.

I’d like to work with others to create this. How do I do that?

You can work alone, with a partner, or with up to three other people. So, for example, in a group of four, two people might act as photographers, while the other two interview community members. When you are ready to edit your material and write up what you have discovered, the interviewers could use their notes to handle the short introduction, while the photographers could edit their shots into a meaningful visual sequence, and help collaborate on the captions.

Please remember, however, that you can only have your name on one submission.

Do I need permission to photograph the people in this community?

You do. It is good journalistic practice to tell the people you are photographing why you are taking pictures of them, and to ask their permission. They should also know that, if you are a winner, their image and name may appear online.

Though you do not have to have a signed permission sheet from every participant, if you are a winner and we publish your work, we will need to be able to reach those depicted, so please get their contact information before you take their pictures. (If you are photographing young children, this is especially important. Secure a parent or guardian’s permission first.)

An important exception to this: If you are taking photos of crowds in public places, such as at a sporting event, a community meeting or a local fair, you don’t need to worry about permissions, as it would be impossible to get them from all attendees.

I don’t know where to begin! What advice do you have?

Once you’ve chosen a community to photograph, begin by introducing yourself to ensure the participants are open to your project. Then, devote a bit of time to just observing, noticing how and where the members of this group spend time, what they do together, and how they relate to each other.

When you’re ready to start documenting what you find, our step-by-step guide will help you take it from there.

QUESTIONS ABOUT JUDGING

How will my photo essay be judged?

Your work will be read by New York Times journalists as well as by Learning Network staff members and educators from around the United States. We will use this rubric to judge entries.

What’s the prize?

Having your work published on The Learning Network and being eligible to be chosen to have your work published in the print editions of The New York Times.

When will the winners be announced?

About two months after the contest has closed.

QUESTIONS ABOUT THE RULES

Who is eligible to participate in this contest?

This contest is open to students ages 13 to 19 who are in middle school or high school around the world. College students cannot submit an entry. However, high school students (including high school postgraduate students) who are taking one or more college classes can participate. Students attending their first year of a two-year CEGEP in Quebec Province can also participate. In addition, students age 19 or under who have completed high school but are taking a gap year or are otherwise not enrolled in college can participate.

The children and stepchildren of New York Times employees are not eligible to enter this contest. Nor are students who live in the same household as those employees.

Why are you asking for an Artist’s Statement about our process? What will you do with it?

All of us who work on The Learning Network are former teachers. One of the many things we miss, now that we work in a newsroom rather than a classroom, is being able to see how students are reacting to our “assignments” in real time — and to offer help, or tweaks, to make those assignments better. We’re asking you to reflect on what you did and why, and what was hard or easy about it, in large part so that we can improve our contests and the curriculum we create to support them. This is especially important for new contests, like this one.

Another reason? We have heard from many teachers that writing these statements is immensely helpful to students. Stepping back from a piece and trying to put into words what you wanted to express, and why and how you made artistic choices to do that, can help you see your piece anew and figure out how to make it stronger. For our staff, they offer important context that help us understand individual students and submissions, and learn more about the conditions under which students around the world create.

Whom can I contact if I have questions about this contest or am having issues submitting my entry?

Leave a comment on this post or write to us at [email protected].

QUESTIONS ABOUT TEACHING WITH THIS CONTEST

Do my students need a New York Times subscription to access these resources?

No. Students can get free access to the entire Where We Are series through The Learning Network . (All 13 photo essays are listed above, in our Resources section.) In addition, our related student forum , activity sheet and “how to” guide are also free, as are everything they link to.

However, if you are interested in learning more about school subscriptions, visit this page .

I’m not an art teacher. Can this work for my students too?

Yes! Though this is a new contest for us, we chose it in part because the theme of “community” is such an important one in subjects across the curriculum. In fact, we hope it might inspire teachers in different curriculum areas to collaborate.

For example, students in social studies could investigate the role of community locally, learning about the history of different influential groups. An English teacher might support students as they interview and craft their introductions and photo captions, while an art teacher could offer tips for photo composition. And, of course, a journalism teacher could guide the full project, or work with other teachers to publish the most successful results in the school paper.

How do my students prove to me that they entered this contest?

After they press “Submit” on the form below, they will see a “Thank you for your submission.” line appear. They can take a screenshot of this message. Please note: Our system does not currently send confirmation emails.

Please read the following carefully before you submit:

Students who are 13 and older in the United States or the United Kingdom, or 16 and older elsewhere in the world, can submit their own entries. Those who are 13 to 15 and live outside the United States or the United Kingdom must have an adult submit on their behalf.

All students who are under 18 must provide a parent or guardian’s permission to enter.

You will not receive email confirmation of your submission. After you submit, you will see the message “Thank you for your submission.” That means we received your entry. If you need proof of entry for your teacher, please screenshot that message.

Here is an example of how you might submit a photo with a caption and a photographer credit (Ashley Markle is the photographer):

If you have questions about your submission, please write to us at [email protected] and provide the email address you used for submission.

United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit

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educational competition essay

Banner Graphic Images: Background: U.S. Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. - Left: Excerpt from page 9 (emphasis added) of the unanimous Supreme Court ruling in Brown v. Board of Education , May 17, 1954. Courtesy of the National Archives & Records Administration - Right: A nearly empty hallway at Central High School, Little Rock, Arkansas, during the time that it was closed to avoid integrating, Sept. 1958. Thomas J. O'Halloran, Courtesy of the Library of Congress

*Entries for the 2024 Essay Contest are closed.*

*CONTEST DEADLINE EXTENDED TO ...*

*2024 Essay Contest Winners Announced*

Seventy years ago, the Supreme Court held in Brown v. Board of Education , 347 U.S. 483 (1954), that racial segregation in public schools violates the United States Constitution. The Court recognized that public education is "the very foundation of good citizenship," and Brown 's impact on education and society has been the subject of much discussion and debate in our nation's history.

Has the decision in Brown , viewed through the lens of 2024, achieved its purpose of ensuring equal opportunity in public education?

Consider one or more of these questions in preparing your essay:

  • What purpose, or purposes, does Brown 's goal of diversity in schools serve in educating citizens in a democracy?
  • What is the importance of Brown and the equal protection of the laws in later educational or societal changes?
  • What institutions or groups should play a role in ensuring racial diversity in education, and how?
  • How did the decision in Brown impact other landmark Supreme Court decisions?
  • In deciding cases with a major impact on society, like Brown , should the Supreme Court consider public opinion on the subject at issue? If so, how would the Court evaluate the public opinion in making its decision?

Who May Enter

The Fourth Circuit Student Essay Contest is open to all students currently in grades 6 through 12 from Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia.

Note: Prior award winners as well as children, grandchildren, stepchildren, and members of the household of a federal judge or federal judiciary employee are excluded from the competition.

Submission Deadline

Your essay and entry form must be submitted by 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time on Friday, May 31, 2024 . The contest entry form has instructions for submitting your essay. Your essay must be submitted at the same time as your entry form.

  • Understanding of constitutional principles (35 points) Demonstrates a clear understanding of the historical context and significance of Brown v. Board of Education .
  • Analysis and interpretation (25 points) Provides thoughtful analysis and considers competing viewpoints before reaching a conclusion.
  • Clarity and organization (20 points) Presents ideas clearly and in well-structured paragraphs. Maintains focus on a central theme.
  • Evidence and support (10 points) Identifies and attributes information from credible sources. Students will not be graded based on citation format, but the reader should be able to easily identify the source.
  • Grammar, spelling, and composition (10 points) Uses appropriate vocabulary and sentence structure, with minimal spelling or grammatical errors.

Exceeding the word limit, missing the submission deadline, using AI-generated content, plagiarizing content, providing false entry information, and not adhering to the rules are grounds for disqualification.

Length & Format

Essays are limited to the length indicated for each grade group . Citations should be placed in footnotes, endnotes, works cited, or a bibliography and are excluded from the word count. Submit your essay without your name in the following format:

  • Grades 9–12: Microsoft Word or Adobe Acrobat PDF document
  • Grades 6–8: Text typed or pasted into form section
  • Do not submit your essay as a link.

Winners will be announced in August 2024, and the winning essays will be presented at the Fourth Circuit's Constitution Day Program in September 2024.

Contest Flyer

Contact the Clerk's Office at [email protected] or (804) 916-2715.

educational competition essay

Submit Your Entry Form & Essay

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Competition Essay Topics

educational competition essay

  • The Impact of Quality Management on Domestic and International Competition
  • Benefits of Competition for Producers and Consumers
  • Ideal Competition
  • Competitive Monopoly
  • The Function of Advertising in Oligopoly and Monopolistic Competition
  • The Market Structure of Monopolistic Competition
  • Competition Among Doctors for Status and Power
  • Monopolistic Competition, as Opposed to Pure Competition
  • Economics-Related Competition
  • Competition: as It Affects the Market
  • Contest with Baskin-Robbins
  • An Economic Model Based on Cournot competition
  • Competition from Apple Inc.
  • Industry Competition for Golf Equipment
  • Competition Among Sony, Nintendo, and Microsoft
  • Economics of Oligopolistic Firms’ Competition
  • Market Oligopoly and Competition
  • Cooperation Versus Competition: as a Learning and Student Achievement Evaluation Strategy
  • Manufacturing, Globalization, and Competition
  • Strategies for Healthcare Organization Consolidation and Competition
  • Impact of E.U. Competition Policy
  • Competition between Oligopolies and Monopolies
  • International Competition and Foreign Direct Investment
  • Competition in the 2008 Movie Rental Market
  • Competition from Cruises in the Tourism Sector
  • Law Relating to the Microsoft Corporation
  • Market Expansion and Rivalry
  • How the Competition Commission’s decision to Sell Two Airports May Affect BAA
  • Competitors: Pepsi and Coke
  • Market Organization: Monopoly Competition

Essay Topics on Competition

  • There is Competition in the Service Sector.
  • An Examination of Market Expansion and Rivalry in the Juice Sector
  • Competition Among U.K. Banks in Financial Economics
  • Failure of the Market: Lack of Competition
  • Essential Management Techniques in the Service Industry
  • Market Monopoly and Price Discrimination
  • The 2009 Golf Equipment Market Was Competitive.
  • Critiques of the Standard Neoclassical View of Competition from the Post-Keynesian and Austrian Perspectives
  • Market Competitivity
  • The Grocery Market in Australia Is Competitive.
  • Developing A Brand for British Tomatoes: Addressing Threats from New Foreign Competition
  • Promotion of Competition in China
  • Governing Laws and Regulations for Joint Ventures and Competition
  • Competition and Consumer Commission of Australia
  • The Evolution of Print Media and Internet Competition
  • Competition Among Sports Drinks, Energy Drinks, and Vitamin-Infused Beverages
  • Making Economic Changes to Address Climate Change and Global Resource Competition
  • Using the Competition Strategy as a Tool for Global and Strategic Marketing
  • Market Competition and IKEA
  • Mobile Phone Monopoly Competition
  • Competition from Big-Box Stores
  • Microeconomics: Monopoly and Competition
  • Positions in the Market of Amazon and Aldi
  • Competition between Walmart and Amazon
  • A Characterization of Competition and Oligopolistic Behavior in the Airline Industry
  • The Competition and Strategy of the McDonald’s Company
  • Competition between Japan Airlines and Airbus in International Management
  • Competition Analysis for Energy Drinks
  • Competitiveness at Work
  • Monopolies or Competition in the Airlines Sector

Fascinating Competition Topics to Write about

  • History of the World: Is Competition Good?
  • The Unsatisfactory Competition of United Parcel Service
  • The Function of Competition: Authorities in the U.K.’s Market Correction
  • Japanese Consumption: Symbolic Competition
  • Markets Worldwide and Competition: Effect on the Trade Balance.
  • Collaborative and Competitive: Effects on Workplace Creativity
  • The Benefits and Drawbacks of Competition in Society
  • The Consequences of Competition on Performance at The La Fitness Center
  • The United States Antitrust and Competition Laws
  • Economics: International Business and Home Market Competition
  • Competition Among Kate Spade, Juicy Couture, Joie, and Zara
  • British Laws Governing Employment, Competition, and Consumer Protection
  • Competition, Positioning, and Market Blending in Marketing
  • Competition between the Five Forces Model and the Blue Ocean Strategy
  • Challenges Facing College Students: Costs and Competition
  • Competition and Energy Infrastructure in Europe
  • Contests Sponsored by Weight Watchers International Inc.
  • The UAE’s Law Governing Competition
  • Growing World Competition as a Result of Globalization
  • Transparency and Political Competition in Iran
  • The Vision, Mission, and Competition of Procter & Gamble
  • The United Arab Emirates Has Fierce Airline Competition.
  • Competition in Car Parking Cases and Prior Experience
  • Lack of Staff and Competition at Southwest Airlines
  • Organizational Entrepreneurship in the Context of Competition
  • Corporate Governance and Competition at Boeing
  • Strategy and Hospital Competition
  • Competitors and Talents in Emerging Markets
  • Competition from Apple in the Chinese Smartphone Market

Competition Essay Titles

  • Mission and Competition of Market-Driven Company
  • Externalities, Resources, Supply, Demand, and Competition
  • Competitivity and the Ethics of the Chief Marketing Officer
  • Competition between the Matsushita and Philips Companies
  • Infrastructural Factors and Their Impact on the Market
  • The Competition for Plentyoffish.com and Its Approach
  • Laws Governing Competition and Antitrust
  • Competition Among the Companies Google, Apple, and Facebook
  • Problem with Competition at TFC TV Company.
  • Starbucks versus Tim Hortons: Business Rivalry
  • Amazon’s Rivalry with Walmart and Alibaba
  • Innovating for Better Competition: Ford Company
  • The Competition and Strategy of Caterpillar Company
  • Information Technology at Groupon Company and the Competition
  • Supply Chain Issues and Intense Competition.
  • The McDonald’s Corporation and Its Rivals
  • Operation of Business and Perfect Competition
  • The Emphasis of the Genzyme Company on Orphan Drugs and Rivalry
  • Innovative Recycling Competition: Raising Public Awareness
  • Conflicts with the Competition at Cooley Distillery Company
  • Market Monopolization and Oligopoly
  • K. Construction Industry: Competitive Strategies Employed and Industry Structure
  • The Competition in the U.S. Healthcare Market in the Past
  • Competition Under Trademarks: Fair and Unfair
  • Competition, Cooperation, and Fairness in Conflict
  • The Competition Among Nightclub Monopolies in the U.K.
  • Challenge for the RAC Motoring Services Company’s Competition
  • Market and Competition in Luxembourg’s Tourism
  • Pricing and Strategy for Software Competition
  • Tamweel’s Outsourcing Plan: Business Rivalry

Interesting Topics to Write about Competition

  • Competitive Integration: Vertical versus Horizontal
  • Hardball Techniques to Beat the Competition
  • Competition and Marketing at Airports
  • Price Increases: While Preserving Competition at Alias
  • Analyzing Competition in The Psychology of Rivalry
  • German Competition Authorities Addressing Market Inefficiencies
  • US-China Rivalry in the Banking Sector
  • Monopoly Pricing Techniques During Competition
  • Products Offered by Tiffany & Co. Retailers and Rivalry
  • The Helfer and DuBurke Book Malcolm X  Is up for Reading.
  • Porter’s Book, Clusters and the New Economics of Competition.
  • Competition from Low-Cost Carriers in Europe
  • What Causes Collaboration and Conflict?
  • The InBev Company: Rivalry and Plan
  • Evaluation of Kirzner’s Competition and Entrepreneurship
  • Protectionism as a Means of Defending Domestic Industries Against Foreign Competition
  • Globalization, Fair Trade, and Open Markets
  • Quality Control for Local and International Competition
  • The Console Video Game Market Competition
  • A Case of Unethical Competition: Microsoft
  • Norms of Conduct and Competition at AllSafe Insurance Company
  • Monopolistic Competition as a Concept
  • Law Governing Competition in the United Arab Emirates
  • Utilizing Quality Functions to Manage Market Competition
  • Price Stabilization and Monopoly Competition
  • Requirements for the Acquisition Process and Competition
  • Strong Competition in the Grocery Industry

Good Research Topics About Immigration Reform

Student portfolios: everything you need to know.

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Matthew Lynch

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International Mother Language Day at UNESCO

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Today, 40% of the world’s population does not have access to education in a language they speak or understand. In some countries this figure rises to over 90%.  Yet research shows that the use of learners’ own language(s) in schools provides a solid foundation for learning, boosts self-esteem and critical thinking skills, and opens the door for inter-generational learning, language revitalization, and the preservation of culture and intangible heritage.

UNESCO’s celebration of International Mother Language Day 2024 will highlight the importance of implementing multilingual education policies and practices as a pillar to the achievement of Sustainable Development Goal 4 which calls for inclusive, quality education and lifelong learning for all as well as to the objectives of the International Decade on Indigenous Languages (2022 – 2032). 

Join experts in early childhood education, literacy, informal learning and indigenous languages as they discuss how multilingual education policies and practices can be implemented to ensure inclusive, quality learning for all that enhances not only learning outcomes but the transmission of intergenerational knowledge, languages, culture and intangible heritage.

This year's event at UNESCO HQ will include two panel discussions on multilingual education. Interpretation will be provided in English, French and Spanish. 

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  1. Best We The Students Essay Contest ~ Thatsnotus

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COMMENTS

  1. Essay Competition 2024

    The Immerse Education Essay Competition is open to students worldwide of all nationalities. You must be aged between 13-18 during your chosen programme. List of Essay Topics 13-15 Years 16-18 Years Register Interest Programme Overview Programme Prizes Reviews and Winners FAQ Prizes 1st place 10 winners will receive a 100% scholarship

  2. Cambridge Re:think Essay Competition 2024

    Essay Competition Discourse, debate, and analysis Cambridge Re:think Essay Competition 2024 Competition Opens: 15th January, 2024 Essay Submission Deadline: 10th May, 2024 Result Announcement: 25th June, 2024 Award Ceremony and Dinner at the University of Cambridge: 30th July, 2024

  3. The Harvard Crimson Global Essay Competition

    The Harvard Crimson Global Essay Competition provides a platform for young, ambitious high school students to exercise their writing skills and compete with students from all over the world! This competition encourages students to challenge themselves and explore different writing styles to ultimately strengthen their writing skills.

  4. International Essay Competition

    Students Parents Teachers Click here to download free Essay Competition Guidance Welcome to our prestigious International Essay Competition. At Avernus Education, we are thrilled to provide a platform for young minds to showcase their prowess in Medicine, Engineering, Law, Economics, Psychology, History and Politics.

  5. Oxford and Cambridge Essay Competitions

    This essay competition is designed to give students the opportunity to develop and showcase their independent study and writing skills. Unfortunately, for external reasons, the essay won't be running in 2023, but may well be running in 2024 so do keep an eye out so you don't miss it! Sample Essay Questions from 2020.

  6. Best 46 Essay Writing Contests in 2024

    The Best Essay Writing Contests of 2024 Writing competitions curated by Reedsy Genre All Children's Christian Crime Essay Fantasy Fiction Flash Fiction Horror Humor LGBTQ Memoir Mystery Non-fiction Novel Novella Poetry Romance Science Fiction Science Writing Script Writing Short Story Suspense Thriller Travel Young Adult Manage a competition?

  7. 2024 Essay Competition

    2024 Global ESSAY PRIZE. The John Locke Institute encourages young people to cultivate the characteristics that turn good students into great writers: independent thought, depth of knowledge, clear reasoning, critical analysis and persuasive style. Our Essay Competition invites students to explore a wide range of challenging and interesting ...

  8. Essay Competition: 2022 Winning Essay (16-18)

    Take a look at one of the winning entries to the Immerse Education Essay Competition from the Business Management category. Congratulations to all participants and in particular to those who won 100% scholarships! by Kornelia K. Read Kornelias Scholarship Story Here. What makes a good role model in business?

  9. Essay Competition FULL PARTICIPANT GUIDE

    THE 2022 IMMERSE ESSAY COMPETITION 01 A chance to win a full or partial scholarship to one of our programmes in Oxford, Cambridge or London. 02 Full suppport from our team as you write your essay, with free guides and top tips. 03 A chance for you to demonstrate your content knowledge by answering advanced university-style questions. 04 Good ...

  10. Civics Education Essay Contest

    NCSC's Civics Education Essay Contest gives 3rd-12th grade students the opportunity to understand and explain the importance and the role of the United States government. Each student must have an email address and submit their essay using the link below. The contest ends at midnight on March 22. Good luck! Submit your essay Informational Video

  11. Immerse Education Essay Competition 2021: What makes a good ...

    Four highly motivated Grade 10 students spent a portion of their Christmas holiday writing submissions for the Immerse Education Essay Competition in the hope of winning a 100% scholarship to attend a summer course at Cambridge University in the UK. The competition is a challenging one: entrants must pick one question from a list of eighteen controversial topics and have only 500 words to ...

  12. Avernus Education International Essay Competition 2023/24

    Call for entries for the Avernus Education International Essay Competition 2024! Avernus Education is excited to give young people a chance to demonstrate their aptitude in the fields of politics, history, psychology, engineering, law, and medicine. These diverse topic areas highlight the value of interdisciplinary education, which is essential ...

  13. Immerse Education Essay Competition 2024

    The Immerse Education Essay Competition provides the opportunity for students aged 13-18 to submit essay responses to a question of their choice relating to a subject of interest. There are over twenty questions to choose from which can be found in the full Essay Competition Guide. 10 winners will receive a 100% scholarship to study at a world ...

  14. George S. & Stella M. Knight Essay Contest

    Contest entries must be submitted as PDF files attached to emails. The essay encompasses four parts: a title page, essay pages, a bibliography or works cited, and the applicant's biography. Strict adherence to formatting rules is crucial for acceptance and includes specific guidelines for the title page, essay pages, bibliography, and biography.

  15. Avernus Education International Essay Competition

    Welcome to our prestigious International Essay Competition. At Avernus Education, we are thrilled to provide a platform for young minds to showcase their prowess in Medicine, Engineering, Law, Economics, Psychology, History and Politics. These varied subject categories underscore the importance of interdisciplinary study, a crucial foundation ...

  16. Immerse Education Essay Competition Details

    The Immerse Education Essay Competition provides the opportunity for students aged 13-18 to submit essay responses to a pre-set question relating to their chosen subject. 10 winners will receive a 100% scholarship, with runner-up prizes also awarded. Immerse Education was founded in 2012 with the aim of providing studen...

  17. Fourth Circuit 2024 Essay Contest Now Open to Students in Grades 6-12

    The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit 2024 essay contest is now open to all students currently in grades 6 through 12 from Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia. Students are invited to consider and share their thoughts on the question: "Has the decision in Brown, viewed through the lens of 2024 ...

  18. The Role of Competition and Culture in our Education Systems

    1 (http://tinyurl.com/68qxrmr) Competition and Education Competition is considered by many as healthy, a fact of life, and is an implicit part of education, in which grades are regularly assigned and students ranked against each other in class reports in many countries.

  19. Immerse Education essay competition winner Riya

    Take a look at one of the winning entries to the Immerse Education Essay Competition from the Medicine category. Congratulations to all participants and in particular to those who won 100% scholarships! by Riya R. Read Riya's Scholarship Story Here. How important are soft skills for medical professionals?

  20. Unionville-Chadds Ford Virtual Academy students honored for winning

    Unionville-Chadds Ford Virtual Academy students honored for winning essay contest. Pictured from left to right are Dr. Mark Slider, Shannon Brown, Lucas Yates, Lillianna Yates, Elberta Cintron and ...

  21. 'Where We Are': A Photo Essay Contest for Exploring Community

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  22. 2024 Fourth Circuit Essay Contest

    The Fourth Circuit Student Essay Contest is open to all students currently in grades 6 through 12 from Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia. Prior award winners as well as children, grandchildren, stepchildren, and members of the household of a federal judge or federal judiciary employee are excluded from the ...

  23. Competition Essay Topics

    Competition Essay Titles. Mission and Competition of Market-Driven Company; Externalities, Resources, Supply, Demand, and Competition ... The Edvocate was created in 2014 to argue for shifts in education policy and organization in order to enhance the quality of education and the opportunities for learning afforded to P-20 students in America ...

  24. (PDF) Competition in Education

    First, we show how competitive ideologies, values and norms are transmitted from society to educational institutions, in particular ideologies and values such as meritocracy, the belief in a fair...

  25. Why Competition Is Beneficial in Education

    In this argumentative essay, a student explains why competition is beneficial in education. The student asserts that competition helps students learn teamwork, keeps students motivated, and improves social and emotional learning in students. This essay received a B by one of Kibin's paper graders.

  26. NCSC Civics Education Essay contest is now open

    The NCSC (National Center for State Courts) annual Civics Education Essay contest is now open. All elementary, middle, and high school students in grades 3-12 are encouraged to participate. Prize money will be awarded to the top three winners from elementary, middle, and high schools. Essays will be accepted online through midnight ET, Friday ...

  27. International Mother Language Day at UNESCO

    UNESCO's celebration of International Mother Language Day 2024 will highlight the importance of implementing multilingual education policies and practices as a pillar to the achievement of Sustainable Development Goal 4 which calls for inclusive, quality education and lifelong learning for all as well as to the objectives of the International ...

  28. Supreme Court passes on another affirmative action case

    The U.S. Supreme Court declined to intervene Tuesday in a closely watched case concerning admissions policies meant to increase racial diversity at an elite Virginia magnet high school, potentially green-lighting a set of "race-neutral" admission practices for higher ed institutions seeking to counteract the court's affirmative action ban ...

  29. U.S. offers temporary patch for FAFSA technical glitch

    The Education Department said Tuesday it will fix a technical glitch in its new Free Application for Federal Student Aid that has locked out students whose parents do not have Social Security numbers.. The agency announced the fix, which is supposed to be implemented by mid-March, in new guidance that offers those students a temporary workaround in the meantime.